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Progeny's lipid and lipoprotein levels by parental mortality. The Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study.
Circulation. 1986 Jan; 73(1 Pt 2):I51-61.Circ

Abstract

Using data from Lipid Research Clinics study participants at visit 2 (3972 and 2346 adult men and women), we examined the hypothesis that parental mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer before age 60 predicts their adult progeny's lipid and lipoprotein levels. Weighted regression analysis was used to control for the potential effect of progeny's other CVD risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, Quetelet index, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption), and to assess for the effect of progeny's parental cause-specific mortality status on progeny's lipids and lipoproteins. Nearly all of the statistically significant parent-progeny predictions were for sons. Paternal death from CVD before age 60 years was associated with significantly higher plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in sons and (at marginal significance) in daughters, when compared with those in reference progeny with paternal survival over age 60 or over age 75. Maternal death from CVD before 60 was associated with lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in sons. Paternal and maternal death from cancer before age 60 years were associated with higher triglyceride levels in adult sons than in sons whose parents had lived beyond ages 60 and 75. Paternal all-cause mortality before age 60 was associated with higher cholesterol and triglycerides in sons; maternal all-cause mortality before age 60 was associated with depression of HDL-C in sons. Familial aggregation of lipids and lipoproteins may account, in part, for familial aggregation of CVD. Knowledge of family history facilitates identification of progeny at higher risk for CVD by virtue of elevated cholesterol or LDL-C, or reduced HDL-C.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3940684

Citation

Glueck, C J., et al. "Progeny's Lipid and Lipoprotein Levels By Parental Mortality. the Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study." Circulation, vol. 73, no. 1 Pt 2, 1986, pp. I51-61.
Glueck CJ, Laskarzewski PM, Suchindran CM, et al. Progeny's lipid and lipoprotein levels by parental mortality. The Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study. Circulation. 1986;73(1 Pt 2):I51-61.
Glueck, C. J., Laskarzewski, P. M., Suchindran, C. M., Chambless, L. E., Barrett-Connor, E., Stewart, P., Heiss, G., & Tyroler, H. A. (1986). Progeny's lipid and lipoprotein levels by parental mortality. The Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study. Circulation, 73(1 Pt 2), I51-61.
Glueck CJ, et al. Progeny's Lipid and Lipoprotein Levels By Parental Mortality. the Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study. Circulation. 1986;73(1 Pt 2):I51-61. PubMed PMID: 3940684.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Progeny's lipid and lipoprotein levels by parental mortality. The Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study. AU - Glueck,C J, AU - Laskarzewski,P M, AU - Suchindran,C M, AU - Chambless,L E, AU - Barrett-Connor,E, AU - Stewart,P, AU - Heiss,G, AU - Tyroler,H A, PY - 1986/1/1/pubmed PY - 1986/1/1/medline PY - 1986/1/1/entrez SP - I51 EP - 61 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 73 IS - 1 Pt 2 N2 - Using data from Lipid Research Clinics study participants at visit 2 (3972 and 2346 adult men and women), we examined the hypothesis that parental mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer before age 60 predicts their adult progeny's lipid and lipoprotein levels. Weighted regression analysis was used to control for the potential effect of progeny's other CVD risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, Quetelet index, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption), and to assess for the effect of progeny's parental cause-specific mortality status on progeny's lipids and lipoproteins. Nearly all of the statistically significant parent-progeny predictions were for sons. Paternal death from CVD before age 60 years was associated with significantly higher plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in sons and (at marginal significance) in daughters, when compared with those in reference progeny with paternal survival over age 60 or over age 75. Maternal death from CVD before 60 was associated with lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in sons. Paternal and maternal death from cancer before age 60 years were associated with higher triglyceride levels in adult sons than in sons whose parents had lived beyond ages 60 and 75. Paternal all-cause mortality before age 60 was associated with higher cholesterol and triglycerides in sons; maternal all-cause mortality before age 60 was associated with depression of HDL-C in sons. Familial aggregation of lipids and lipoproteins may account, in part, for familial aggregation of CVD. Knowledge of family history facilitates identification of progeny at higher risk for CVD by virtue of elevated cholesterol or LDL-C, or reduced HDL-C. SN - 0009-7322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3940684/Progeny's_lipid_and_lipoprotein_levels_by_parental_mortality__The_Lipid_Research_Clinics_Program_Prevalence_Study_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=3940684 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -