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Contraceptive use, pregnancy and fertility patterns among single American women in their 20s.
Fam Plann Perspect. 1985 Jan-Feb; 17(1):10-9.FP

Abstract

Eighty-two percent of never-married American women aged 20-29 have had sexual intercourse; black women are somewhat more likely than white women to have had intercourse. In all, 53 percent of never-married women in this age-group had intercourse at least once in the four weeks preceding the 1983 National Survey of Unmarried Women. Black women are more likely than white women to have done so (62 percent compared with 51 percent). Nearly all of the women who ever had intercourse have used a contraceptive method at some time; 78 percent practiced contraception at the time of their most recent intercourse. A high proportion did not start using birth control until some time after first intercourse, however: On average, the delay between first coitus and first contraceptive use was eight months, and one-fifth of the respondents said that they began using a method only after their first pregnancy. Most of the women who did use a method at the time of first intercourse relied on the condom or withdrawal; in contrast, about two-thirds of white women and three-quarters of black women now rely on the pill, IUD or sterilization. Eighty-six percent of the women who had intercourse in the four weeks before the interview were current users--88 percent of the white women and 77 percent of the black women. Catholic women are no less likely than others to have ever had intercourse, to be currently sexually active or to be using contraceptives. However, Catholic women who receive communion at least once a week are less likely to be sexually active and substantially less likely to use medical contraceptive methods. Women who consider themselves very religious are less likely to be sexually active, but the sexually active among them are about as likely as others to use contraceptives. Better-educated women are much more likely than less-educated women to practice contraception, and women who work outside of the home are more likely than those who do not to use contraceptives. Thirty-three percent of unmarried 20-29-year-olds have had at least one pregnancy (about 40 percent of those who have ever had intercourse). Thirty-two percent of sexually active white women have been pregnant, compared with 70 percent of comparable black women. Furthermore, whereas 14 percent of white 20-29-year-olds have had an out-of-wedlock birth, 62 percent of black women have done so.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3979524

Citation

Tanfer, K, and M C. Horn. "Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy and Fertility Patterns Among Single American Women in Their 20s." Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 17, no. 1, 1985, pp. 10-9.
Tanfer K, Horn MC. Contraceptive use, pregnancy and fertility patterns among single American women in their 20s. Fam Plann Perspect. 1985;17(1):10-9.
Tanfer, K., & Horn, M. C. (1985). Contraceptive use, pregnancy and fertility patterns among single American women in their 20s. Family Planning Perspectives, 17(1), 10-9.
Tanfer K, Horn MC. Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy and Fertility Patterns Among Single American Women in Their 20s. Fam Plann Perspect. 1985 Jan-Feb;17(1):10-9. PubMed PMID: 3979524.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contraceptive use, pregnancy and fertility patterns among single American women in their 20s. AU - Tanfer,K, AU - Horn,M C, PY - 1985/1/1/pubmed PY - 1985/1/1/medline PY - 1985/1/1/entrez KW - Acceptor Characteristics KW - Acceptors KW - Adult KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Behavior KW - Blacks--women KW - Catholicism KW - Christianity KW - Coitus KW - Comparative Studies KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive History KW - Contraceptive Methods Chosen KW - Contraceptive Usage KW - Cultural Background KW - Demographic Factors KW - Demographic Surveys KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Family Planning KW - Family Planning Programs KW - Fertility KW - Fertility Measurements KW - Fertility Surveys KW - Marital Status--women KW - Never Married--women KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Nuptiality KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Pregnancy History KW - Premarital Sex Behavior KW - Previous Practice KW - Religion KW - Reproductive Behavior KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Sex Behavior KW - Studies KW - Surveys KW - Time Factors KW - United States KW - Unwanted Births KW - Whites--women SP - 10 EP - 9 JF - Family planning perspectives JO - Fam Plann Perspect VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - Eighty-two percent of never-married American women aged 20-29 have had sexual intercourse; black women are somewhat more likely than white women to have had intercourse. In all, 53 percent of never-married women in this age-group had intercourse at least once in the four weeks preceding the 1983 National Survey of Unmarried Women. Black women are more likely than white women to have done so (62 percent compared with 51 percent). Nearly all of the women who ever had intercourse have used a contraceptive method at some time; 78 percent practiced contraception at the time of their most recent intercourse. A high proportion did not start using birth control until some time after first intercourse, however: On average, the delay between first coitus and first contraceptive use was eight months, and one-fifth of the respondents said that they began using a method only after their first pregnancy. Most of the women who did use a method at the time of first intercourse relied on the condom or withdrawal; in contrast, about two-thirds of white women and three-quarters of black women now rely on the pill, IUD or sterilization. Eighty-six percent of the women who had intercourse in the four weeks before the interview were current users--88 percent of the white women and 77 percent of the black women. Catholic women are no less likely than others to have ever had intercourse, to be currently sexually active or to be using contraceptives. However, Catholic women who receive communion at least once a week are less likely to be sexually active and substantially less likely to use medical contraceptive methods. Women who consider themselves very religious are less likely to be sexually active, but the sexually active among them are about as likely as others to use contraceptives. Better-educated women are much more likely than less-educated women to practice contraception, and women who work outside of the home are more likely than those who do not to use contraceptives. Thirty-three percent of unmarried 20-29-year-olds have had at least one pregnancy (about 40 percent of those who have ever had intercourse). Thirty-two percent of sexually active white women have been pregnant, compared with 70 percent of comparable black women. Furthermore, whereas 14 percent of white 20-29-year-olds have had an out-of-wedlock birth, 62 percent of black women have done so.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) SN - 0014-7354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3979524/Contraceptive_use_pregnancy_and_fertility_patterns_among_single_American_women_in_their_20s_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5922 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -