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Cognitive styles and learning styles as predictors of academic success in a graduate allied health education program.
J Allied Health. 1985 Feb; 14(1):89-98.JA

Abstract

The inclusion of noncognitive variables in the admissions decision process has been suggested as a reliable means of more fully assessing the potential abilities of individuals within the applicant pool. An increase in predictive efficiency is particularly important now that allied health educational programs are faced with a continuing decline in the number of applicants. This study was designed to determine whether cognitive-style and learning-style variables are predictive of success in a graduate allied health education program. Three cognitive-style measures were used to assess integrative complexity, dogmatism, and field-independence-dependence. Learning-style preferences were measured by Canfield's Learning Styles Inventory. Academic success was measured by scores on the Master's Comprehensive Examination (MCE). The results indicated that there was no significant relationship between academic success and the cognitive-style variables. However, a stepwise multiple regression indicated that 20.44% of the variance on the multiple-choice section of the MCE and 41.36% of the variance on the essay portion of the MCE were explained by learning-style variables.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3980292

Citation

Blagg, J D.. "Cognitive Styles and Learning Styles as Predictors of Academic Success in a Graduate Allied Health Education Program." Journal of Allied Health, vol. 14, no. 1, 1985, pp. 89-98.
Blagg JD. Cognitive styles and learning styles as predictors of academic success in a graduate allied health education program. J Allied Health. 1985;14(1):89-98.
Blagg, J. D. (1985). Cognitive styles and learning styles as predictors of academic success in a graduate allied health education program. Journal of Allied Health, 14(1), 89-98.
Blagg JD. Cognitive Styles and Learning Styles as Predictors of Academic Success in a Graduate Allied Health Education Program. J Allied Health. 1985;14(1):89-98. PubMed PMID: 3980292.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive styles and learning styles as predictors of academic success in a graduate allied health education program. A1 - Blagg,J D,Jr PY - 1985/2/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1985/2/1/entrez SP - 89 EP - 98 JF - Journal of allied health JO - J Allied Health VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - The inclusion of noncognitive variables in the admissions decision process has been suggested as a reliable means of more fully assessing the potential abilities of individuals within the applicant pool. An increase in predictive efficiency is particularly important now that allied health educational programs are faced with a continuing decline in the number of applicants. This study was designed to determine whether cognitive-style and learning-style variables are predictive of success in a graduate allied health education program. Three cognitive-style measures were used to assess integrative complexity, dogmatism, and field-independence-dependence. Learning-style preferences were measured by Canfield's Learning Styles Inventory. Academic success was measured by scores on the Master's Comprehensive Examination (MCE). The results indicated that there was no significant relationship between academic success and the cognitive-style variables. However, a stepwise multiple regression indicated that 20.44% of the variance on the multiple-choice section of the MCE and 41.36% of the variance on the essay portion of the MCE were explained by learning-style variables. SN - 0090-7421 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3980292/Cognitive_styles_and_learning_styles_as_predictors_of_academic_success_in_a_graduate_allied_health_education_program_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -