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Effect of wound location and the use of topical collagen gel on exuberant granulation tissue formation and wound healing in the horse and pony.
Am J Vet Res 1985; 46(7):1438-44AJ

Abstract

Preformed collagen gel was topically applied to cutaneous wounds of the equine dorsal fetlock (thoracic limb) and metatarsal regions to evaluate the effect on exuberant granulation tissue production and wound healing. In 6 horses and 3 ponies (less than 140 cm high at the withers and less than 365 kg), 36 standardized cutaneous limb wounds were surgically induced (4 wounds/animal); 18 wounds were treated topically with collagen gel, and 18 wounds were not treated (controls). Collagen gel was initially applied to the wound at 0, 2, or 7 days after wound formation (groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Four measurements were regularly made: amount of wound contraction and the size of the granulation bed, epithelial covering, and total wound. Sequential skin and wound biopsies were evaluated histologically to assess wound healing. Using a computer, data were analyzed for differences in the 4 measurements between treated and control wounds, between fetlock wounds and metatarsal wounds, and among groups 1, 2, and 3. Analyses were performed on days 15 and 45 of wound healing and on the final day of healing. A significant difference (P greater than 0.05) in the production of exuberant granulation tissue, rate of epithelialization, or degree of wound contraction was not detected between the collagen-treated and control wounds. Total healing time and final scar size were similar. Wound healing patterns were significantly different (P less than 0.05) in the fetlock wounds and metatarsal wounds. All wounds enlarged up to day 15 with fetlock wounds enlarging significantly more than did the metatarsal wounds.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

4026023

Citation

Bertone, A L., et al. "Effect of Wound Location and the Use of Topical Collagen Gel On Exuberant Granulation Tissue Formation and Wound Healing in the Horse and Pony." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 46, no. 7, 1985, pp. 1438-44.
Bertone AL, Sullins KE, Stashak TS, et al. Effect of wound location and the use of topical collagen gel on exuberant granulation tissue formation and wound healing in the horse and pony. Am J Vet Res. 1985;46(7):1438-44.
Bertone, A. L., Sullins, K. E., Stashak, T. S., & Norrdin, R. W. (1985). Effect of wound location and the use of topical collagen gel on exuberant granulation tissue formation and wound healing in the horse and pony. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 46(7), pp. 1438-44.
Bertone AL, et al. Effect of Wound Location and the Use of Topical Collagen Gel On Exuberant Granulation Tissue Formation and Wound Healing in the Horse and Pony. Am J Vet Res. 1985;46(7):1438-44. PubMed PMID: 4026023.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of wound location and the use of topical collagen gel on exuberant granulation tissue formation and wound healing in the horse and pony. AU - Bertone,A L, AU - Sullins,K E, AU - Stashak,T S, AU - Norrdin,R W, PY - 1985/7/1/pubmed PY - 1985/7/1/medline PY - 1985/7/1/entrez SP - 1438 EP - 44 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 46 IS - 7 N2 - Preformed collagen gel was topically applied to cutaneous wounds of the equine dorsal fetlock (thoracic limb) and metatarsal regions to evaluate the effect on exuberant granulation tissue production and wound healing. In 6 horses and 3 ponies (less than 140 cm high at the withers and less than 365 kg), 36 standardized cutaneous limb wounds were surgically induced (4 wounds/animal); 18 wounds were treated topically with collagen gel, and 18 wounds were not treated (controls). Collagen gel was initially applied to the wound at 0, 2, or 7 days after wound formation (groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Four measurements were regularly made: amount of wound contraction and the size of the granulation bed, epithelial covering, and total wound. Sequential skin and wound biopsies were evaluated histologically to assess wound healing. Using a computer, data were analyzed for differences in the 4 measurements between treated and control wounds, between fetlock wounds and metatarsal wounds, and among groups 1, 2, and 3. Analyses were performed on days 15 and 45 of wound healing and on the final day of healing. A significant difference (P greater than 0.05) in the production of exuberant granulation tissue, rate of epithelialization, or degree of wound contraction was not detected between the collagen-treated and control wounds. Total healing time and final scar size were similar. Wound healing patterns were significantly different (P less than 0.05) in the fetlock wounds and metatarsal wounds. All wounds enlarged up to day 15 with fetlock wounds enlarging significantly more than did the metatarsal wounds.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/4026023/Effect_of_wound_location_and_the_use_of_topical_collagen_gel_on_exuberant_granulation_tissue_formation_and_wound_healing_in_the_horse_and_pony_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -