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Role of glucagon in diabetes.
Arch Intern Med. 1977 Apr; 137(4):482-91.AI

Abstract

The glucagon-secreting A cell is a vital component of the organ system which regulates the distribution of fuel--the islets of Langerhans. Bihormonal control of glucoregulation through a push-pull system maintains the glucose concentration of extracellular fluid within narrow limits irrespective of glucose flux rates through relative equality of glucose influx and efflux. This equality requires appropriate secretion mixtures of the biologic antagonists, insulin and glucagon, directed by a glucose sensor. In severe diabetes, there are virtually no B cells and A cells are in contact largely with other A cells and their glucose-sensing capacity is lost. The A cell hypersecretes and in most juvenile type diabetics aggressive therapy with insulin fails to restore it to normal. Glucagon is a factor in the development of endogenous hyperglycemia, and ketoacidosis. Its suppression may provide a possible approach in the future pharmacologic management of diabetic hyperglycemia.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

403869

Citation

Unger, R H., and L Orci. "Role of Glucagon in Diabetes." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 137, no. 4, 1977, pp. 482-91.
Unger RH, Orci L. Role of glucagon in diabetes. Arch Intern Med. 1977;137(4):482-91.
Unger, R. H., & Orci, L. (1977). Role of glucagon in diabetes. Archives of Internal Medicine, 137(4), 482-91.
Unger RH, Orci L. Role of Glucagon in Diabetes. Arch Intern Med. 1977;137(4):482-91. PubMed PMID: 403869.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of glucagon in diabetes. AU - Unger,R H, AU - Orci,L, PY - 1977/4/1/pubmed PY - 1977/4/1/medline PY - 1977/4/1/entrez SP - 482 EP - 91 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 137 IS - 4 N2 - The glucagon-secreting A cell is a vital component of the organ system which regulates the distribution of fuel--the islets of Langerhans. Bihormonal control of glucoregulation through a push-pull system maintains the glucose concentration of extracellular fluid within narrow limits irrespective of glucose flux rates through relative equality of glucose influx and efflux. This equality requires appropriate secretion mixtures of the biologic antagonists, insulin and glucagon, directed by a glucose sensor. In severe diabetes, there are virtually no B cells and A cells are in contact largely with other A cells and their glucose-sensing capacity is lost. The A cell hypersecretes and in most juvenile type diabetics aggressive therapy with insulin fails to restore it to normal. Glucagon is a factor in the development of endogenous hyperglycemia, and ketoacidosis. Its suppression may provide a possible approach in the future pharmacologic management of diabetic hyperglycemia. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/403869/Role_of_glucagon_in_diabetes_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/137/pg/482 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -