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Prediction of the relative blood glucose response of mixed meals using the white bread glycemic index.
Diabetes Care 1985 Sep-Oct; 8(5):418-28DC

Abstract

Unexpected plasma glucose responses to different mixed meals fed to normal and diabetic volunteers have recently been reported. We have therefore examined in normal volunteers the effect of mixing carbohydrate foods of different glycemic indices (GIs) without the addition of fat and protein. The observed GI of the mixed meal was within 2% of the expected value. In studies in the literature where fat and protein were added to mixed meals, the observed blood glucose responses also related significantly to the meal GIs calculated from the individual foods. Addition of fat and protein in the quantities used did not obscure this relationship. Studies to determine sources of error in comparing glycemic responses showed that type II diabetic patients displayed the least within-individual variation, and type I diabetic patients the most. Expression of results as the GI rather than as absolute glycemic response areas reduced by 50% the between-subject variation. The mean GI values of rice tested in type I and type II patients were similar (82 +/- 22 compared with 74 +/- 19) and the reproducibility 22 mo later in the same group of subjects was excellent (81 +/- 15 compared with 83 +/- 15). However, the lack of precise GI values for all foods fed in the test meals indicates a need for GI values to be derived for a wider range of individual foodstuffs. The GI approach to classifying foods according to physiologic effect may play a useful role in planning meals and diets in which specific blood glucose profiles are required.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

4053930

Citation

Wolever, T M., et al. "Prediction of the Relative Blood Glucose Response of Mixed Meals Using the White Bread Glycemic Index." Diabetes Care, vol. 8, no. 5, 1985, pp. 418-28.
Wolever TM, Nuttall FQ, Lee R, et al. Prediction of the relative blood glucose response of mixed meals using the white bread glycemic index. Diabetes Care. 1985;8(5):418-28.
Wolever, T. M., Nuttall, F. Q., Lee, R., Wong, G. S., Josse, R. G., Csima, A., & Jenkins, D. J. (1985). Prediction of the relative blood glucose response of mixed meals using the white bread glycemic index. Diabetes Care, 8(5), pp. 418-28.
Wolever TM, et al. Prediction of the Relative Blood Glucose Response of Mixed Meals Using the White Bread Glycemic Index. Diabetes Care. 1985;8(5):418-28. PubMed PMID: 4053930.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prediction of the relative blood glucose response of mixed meals using the white bread glycemic index. AU - Wolever,T M, AU - Nuttall,F Q, AU - Lee,R, AU - Wong,G S, AU - Josse,R G, AU - Csima,A, AU - Jenkins,D J, PY - 1985/9/1/pubmed PY - 1985/9/1/medline PY - 1985/9/1/entrez SP - 418 EP - 28 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 8 IS - 5 N2 - Unexpected plasma glucose responses to different mixed meals fed to normal and diabetic volunteers have recently been reported. We have therefore examined in normal volunteers the effect of mixing carbohydrate foods of different glycemic indices (GIs) without the addition of fat and protein. The observed GI of the mixed meal was within 2% of the expected value. In studies in the literature where fat and protein were added to mixed meals, the observed blood glucose responses also related significantly to the meal GIs calculated from the individual foods. Addition of fat and protein in the quantities used did not obscure this relationship. Studies to determine sources of error in comparing glycemic responses showed that type II diabetic patients displayed the least within-individual variation, and type I diabetic patients the most. Expression of results as the GI rather than as absolute glycemic response areas reduced by 50% the between-subject variation. The mean GI values of rice tested in type I and type II patients were similar (82 +/- 22 compared with 74 +/- 19) and the reproducibility 22 mo later in the same group of subjects was excellent (81 +/- 15 compared with 83 +/- 15). However, the lack of precise GI values for all foods fed in the test meals indicates a need for GI values to be derived for a wider range of individual foodstuffs. The GI approach to classifying foods according to physiologic effect may play a useful role in planning meals and diets in which specific blood glucose profiles are required. SN - 0149-5992 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/4053930/Prediction_of_the_relative_blood_glucose_response_of_mixed_meals_using_the_white_bread_glycemic_index_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/diabeticdiet.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -