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Two models for change in the health services in Zimbabwe.
Int J Health Serv 1985; 15(3):451-68IJ

Abstract

The health situation in pre-Independence Zimbabwe was much as elsewhere in the Third World. While the majority suffered excess mortality and morbidity, the affluent enjoyed a health status similar to that of the populations of developed countries. The health services also showed the familiar pattern, with expenditure concentrated on sophisticated facilities in the towns, leaving the rural majority with practically no services at all. With the coming of Majority Rule, the previous pattern of controlling access to facilities on the basis of race could not continue. Two broad routes forward were defined. On the one hand, the private doctors, the private insurance companies, and the settler state proposed a model based on improving urban facilities, depending on a trickle-down to eventually answer the needs of the rural people. On the other hand, the post-Independence Ministry of Health advocated a policy of concentrating on developing services in the rural areas. The pattern of the future health service will depend on the capacity of the senior health planners and on the enthusiasm of front-line health workers but, of overriding importance will be the political commitment to answer the needs of the majority and the outcome of the inevitable struggle for access to scarce health sector resources.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

4055184

Citation

Bloom, G. "Two Models for Change in the Health Services in Zimbabwe." International Journal of Health Services : Planning, Administration, Evaluation, vol. 15, no. 3, 1985, pp. 451-68.
Bloom G. Two models for change in the health services in Zimbabwe. Int J Health Serv. 1985;15(3):451-68.
Bloom, G. (1985). Two models for change in the health services in Zimbabwe. International Journal of Health Services : Planning, Administration, Evaluation, 15(3), pp. 451-68.
Bloom G. Two Models for Change in the Health Services in Zimbabwe. Int J Health Serv. 1985;15(3):451-68. PubMed PMID: 4055184.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Two models for change in the health services in Zimbabwe. A1 - Bloom,G, PY - 1985/1/1/pubmed PY - 1985/1/1/medline PY - 1985/1/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Blacks KW - Colonialism KW - Community Participation KW - Community Workers KW - Comparative Studies KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Developing Countries KW - Eastern Africa KW - Economic Factors KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Expenditures KW - Financial Activities KW - Government Sponsored Programs KW - Health KW - Health And Welfare Planning KW - Health Facilities KW - Health Personnel KW - Health Services KW - Historical Survey KW - Infant Mortality KW - Medicine KW - Mortality KW - National Health Services KW - Needs KW - Organization And Administration KW - Physicians KW - Political Factors KW - Programs KW - Research Methodology KW - Rural Health Services KW - Social Planning KW - Studies KW - Summary Report KW - Whites KW - Zimbabwe SP - 451 EP - 68 JF - International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation JO - Int J Health Serv VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - The health situation in pre-Independence Zimbabwe was much as elsewhere in the Third World. While the majority suffered excess mortality and morbidity, the affluent enjoyed a health status similar to that of the populations of developed countries. The health services also showed the familiar pattern, with expenditure concentrated on sophisticated facilities in the towns, leaving the rural majority with practically no services at all. With the coming of Majority Rule, the previous pattern of controlling access to facilities on the basis of race could not continue. Two broad routes forward were defined. On the one hand, the private doctors, the private insurance companies, and the settler state proposed a model based on improving urban facilities, depending on a trickle-down to eventually answer the needs of the rural people. On the other hand, the post-Independence Ministry of Health advocated a policy of concentrating on developing services in the rural areas. The pattern of the future health service will depend on the capacity of the senior health planners and on the enthusiasm of front-line health workers but, of overriding importance will be the political commitment to answer the needs of the majority and the outcome of the inevitable struggle for access to scarce health sector resources. SN - 0020-7314 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/4055184/Two_models_for_change_in_the_health_services_in_Zimbabwe_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.2190/KV70-AKEG-Y1JE-KLNE?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -