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Migraine and reporoductive hormones throughout the menstrual cycle.
Lancet. 1975 Mar 08; 1(7906):543-8.Lct

Abstract

In a clinical survey the relation between migraine and menstruation was studied in 142 otherwise healthy women. In 24, onset of migraine coincided with the year of menarch. Of the 138 patients in whom onset of migraine predated the menopause, there were only 13 in whom attacks occurred regularly, and only, just before or during menstruation; in a further 11 attacks occurred regularly in relation to menstruation and at other times. Those with menstrually related migraine were more likely to have onset of migraine at menarche, to have associated weight gain and breast discomfort as part of a periodic syndrome, and to show improvement during pregnancy. There appeared no clear pattern of change at the menopause. In a study of reproductive hormones, blood was collected daily throughout a menstrual cycle from each of 8 women with menstrually related migraine, 6 with menstrually non-related migraine, and 8 healthy headache-free controls. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (F.S.H.), luteinising hormone (L.H.), prolactin, oestrogen, and progesterone were measured in all. Plasma-testosterone was measured in 8 migraine patients. Mean plasma oestrogen and progesterone levels were significantly higher in migraine patients than controls for most of the menstrual cycle, with the most striking differences found in the late luteal phase for progesterone. No significant difference was found between the menstrually related and non-related patients for these or the other hormones measured. Mean plasma-prolactin levels were lower in migraine subjects than controls, but the difference was not significant. Mean plasma F.S.H. and L.H. levels were similar in both migraine and control groups. Plasma-testosterone levels were within the range for normal in the 8 migraine patients studied. No specific hormone changes were associated with the occurrence of a migraine attack, nor did rising or falling levels, or greater increments of change over given cycle phases, appear important in provoking attacks.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

47017

Citation

Epstein, M T., et al. "Migraine and Reporoductive Hormones Throughout the Menstrual Cycle." Lancet (London, England), vol. 1, no. 7906, 1975, pp. 543-8.
Epstein MT, Hockaday JM, Hockaday TD. Migraine and reporoductive hormones throughout the menstrual cycle. Lancet. 1975;1(7906):543-8.
Epstein, M. T., Hockaday, J. M., & Hockaday, T. D. (1975). Migraine and reporoductive hormones throughout the menstrual cycle. Lancet (London, England), 1(7906), 543-8.
Epstein MT, Hockaday JM, Hockaday TD. Migraine and Reporoductive Hormones Throughout the Menstrual Cycle. Lancet. 1975 Mar 8;1(7906):543-8. PubMed PMID: 47017.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Migraine and reporoductive hormones throughout the menstrual cycle. AU - Epstein,M T, AU - Hockaday,J M, AU - Hockaday,T D, PY - 1975/3/8/pubmed PY - 1975/3/8/medline PY - 1975/3/8/entrez SP - 543 EP - 8 JF - Lancet (London, England) JO - Lancet VL - 1 IS - 7906 N2 - In a clinical survey the relation between migraine and menstruation was studied in 142 otherwise healthy women. In 24, onset of migraine coincided with the year of menarch. Of the 138 patients in whom onset of migraine predated the menopause, there were only 13 in whom attacks occurred regularly, and only, just before or during menstruation; in a further 11 attacks occurred regularly in relation to menstruation and at other times. Those with menstrually related migraine were more likely to have onset of migraine at menarche, to have associated weight gain and breast discomfort as part of a periodic syndrome, and to show improvement during pregnancy. There appeared no clear pattern of change at the menopause. In a study of reproductive hormones, blood was collected daily throughout a menstrual cycle from each of 8 women with menstrually related migraine, 6 with menstrually non-related migraine, and 8 healthy headache-free controls. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (F.S.H.), luteinising hormone (L.H.), prolactin, oestrogen, and progesterone were measured in all. Plasma-testosterone was measured in 8 migraine patients. Mean plasma oestrogen and progesterone levels were significantly higher in migraine patients than controls for most of the menstrual cycle, with the most striking differences found in the late luteal phase for progesterone. No significant difference was found between the menstrually related and non-related patients for these or the other hormones measured. Mean plasma-prolactin levels were lower in migraine subjects than controls, but the difference was not significant. Mean plasma F.S.H. and L.H. levels were similar in both migraine and control groups. Plasma-testosterone levels were within the range for normal in the 8 migraine patients studied. No specific hormone changes were associated with the occurrence of a migraine attack, nor did rising or falling levels, or greater increments of change over given cycle phases, appear important in provoking attacks. SN - 0140-6736 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/47017/Migraine_and_reporoductive_hormones_throughout_the_menstrual_cycle_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-6736(75)91558-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -