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Relationships among training, heat acclimation, and heat tolerance in men and women: the controversy revisited.
Med Sci Sports. 1979 Spring; 11(1):56-9.MS

Abstract

For more than a decade there has been a controversy over the beneficial effects of physical training in a cool environment on exercise-heat tolerance. The issues include (a) inadequate controls regarding the physical characteristics of subjects, (b) marked variability in the conditions of the standard heat tolerance tests and (c) differences in the intensity and duration of the training programs employed. Intense training in a cool environment cannot serve as a substitute for exercise in the heat if acclimation is desired within a 2 week period. However, a substantial improvement (50%) in heat tolerance can be derived from 8-11 weeks of training under temperate conditions (21 degrees C) and thermal equilibrium can be maintained for at least 4 hours during mild work (200 W/m2) in dry or wet heat by endurance runners. These adjustments occur in both men and women and appear to be independent of aerobic capacity. The key to improved thermal tolerance with training in a cool environment is maintenance of an elevated core temperature for a sufficient duration of time to produce an adaptive response.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

481157

Citation

Gisolfi, C V., and J S. Cohen. "Relationships Among Training, Heat Acclimation, and Heat Tolerance in Men and Women: the Controversy Revisited." Medicine and Science in Sports, vol. 11, no. 1, 1979, pp. 56-9.
Gisolfi CV, Cohen JS. Relationships among training, heat acclimation, and heat tolerance in men and women: the controversy revisited. Med Sci Sports. 1979;11(1):56-9.
Gisolfi, C. V., & Cohen, J. S. (1979). Relationships among training, heat acclimation, and heat tolerance in men and women: the controversy revisited. Medicine and Science in Sports, 11(1), 56-9.
Gisolfi CV, Cohen JS. Relationships Among Training, Heat Acclimation, and Heat Tolerance in Men and Women: the Controversy Revisited. Med Sci Sports. 1979;11(1):56-9. PubMed PMID: 481157.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships among training, heat acclimation, and heat tolerance in men and women: the controversy revisited. AU - Gisolfi,C V, AU - Cohen,J S, PY - 1979/1/1/pubmed PY - 1979/1/1/medline PY - 1979/1/1/entrez SP - 56 EP - 9 JF - Medicine and science in sports JO - Med Sci Sports VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - For more than a decade there has been a controversy over the beneficial effects of physical training in a cool environment on exercise-heat tolerance. The issues include (a) inadequate controls regarding the physical characteristics of subjects, (b) marked variability in the conditions of the standard heat tolerance tests and (c) differences in the intensity and duration of the training programs employed. Intense training in a cool environment cannot serve as a substitute for exercise in the heat if acclimation is desired within a 2 week period. However, a substantial improvement (50%) in heat tolerance can be derived from 8-11 weeks of training under temperate conditions (21 degrees C) and thermal equilibrium can be maintained for at least 4 hours during mild work (200 W/m2) in dry or wet heat by endurance runners. These adjustments occur in both men and women and appear to be independent of aerobic capacity. The key to improved thermal tolerance with training in a cool environment is maintenance of an elevated core temperature for a sufficient duration of time to produce an adaptive response. SN - 0025-7990 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/481157/Relationships_among_training_heat_acclimation_and_heat_tolerance_in_men_and_women:_the_controversy_revisited_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=481157 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -