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Fever in megaloblastic anemia.
South Med J. 1979 Nov; 72(11):1423-4, 1428.SM

Abstract

Charts of 122 patients with megaloblastic anemia due to either B12 or folic acid deficiency were reviewed for the presence of fever. Fever, defined as a temperature of 100 F (37.8 C) or more, was present in approximately 40% of the patients with both. The elevation was usually minimal but was sometimes over 104 F (40 C), usually in those with more severe anemia and thrombocytopenia, and greater elevations of SGOT and bilirubin concentration. In uncomplicated cases, the temperature returned rapidly to normal after adequate vitamin therapy. Failure of the fever to disappear rapidly with treatment should suggest the probability of some cause other than megaloblastic anemia.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

505076

Citation

McKee, L C.. "Fever in Megaloblastic Anemia." Southern Medical Journal, vol. 72, no. 11, 1979, pp. 1423-4, 1428.
McKee LC. Fever in megaloblastic anemia. South Med J. 1979;72(11):1423-4, 1428.
McKee, L. C. (1979). Fever in megaloblastic anemia. Southern Medical Journal, 72(11), 1423-4, 1428.
McKee LC. Fever in Megaloblastic Anemia. South Med J. 1979;72(11):1423-4, 1428. PubMed PMID: 505076.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fever in megaloblastic anemia. A1 - McKee,L C,Jr PY - 1979/11/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1979/11/1/entrez SP - 1423-4, 1428 JF - Southern medical journal JO - South Med J VL - 72 IS - 11 N2 - Charts of 122 patients with megaloblastic anemia due to either B12 or folic acid deficiency were reviewed for the presence of fever. Fever, defined as a temperature of 100 F (37.8 C) or more, was present in approximately 40% of the patients with both. The elevation was usually minimal but was sometimes over 104 F (40 C), usually in those with more severe anemia and thrombocytopenia, and greater elevations of SGOT and bilirubin concentration. In uncomplicated cases, the temperature returned rapidly to normal after adequate vitamin therapy. Failure of the fever to disappear rapidly with treatment should suggest the probability of some cause other than megaloblastic anemia. SN - 0038-4348 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/505076/Fever_in_megaloblastic_anemia_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=505076.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -