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Locational profiles: incoming veterinary students and outgoing new veterinarians, 1971-78, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University.
Cornell Vet. 1979 Oct; 69(4):345-55.CV

Abstract

Relationships between the demographic areas of incoming veterinary students and first placement locations were examined during 1971-1978 for the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University. Seventy-four percent of the incoming students were New York residents whereas only 52 percent of the graduates selected New York sites for their first placement after graduation. Part of the net loss may be the result of temporary moves into the state to gain residence status, educational preparation and possibly some hope for improving admission eligibility. After completing their veterinary education, they are more likely to return to areas closely associated with family and childhood experiences for first placement choices or for advanced educational offerings. Three demographic classifications were used to identify patterns of movement into and out of the state (Urban, Suburban and Rural). No significant differences in area distribution patterns were observed between incoming and outgoing students/graduates. However, when the data were separated by sex, the outgoing distribution patterns were significantly different for female graduates (Urban and Rural areas preferred over Suburban). Sixty-five percent of the out-of-state placements were in New England and other Northeastern states, with Rural areas showing major strengths.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

527344

Citation

Thompson, J C.. "Locational Profiles: Incoming Veterinary Students and Outgoing New Veterinarians, 1971-78, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University." The Cornell Veterinarian, vol. 69, no. 4, 1979, pp. 345-55.
Thompson JC. Locational profiles: incoming veterinary students and outgoing new veterinarians, 1971-78, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University. Cornell Vet. 1979;69(4):345-55.
Thompson, J. C. (1979). Locational profiles: incoming veterinary students and outgoing new veterinarians, 1971-78, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University. The Cornell Veterinarian, 69(4), 345-55.
Thompson JC. Locational Profiles: Incoming Veterinary Students and Outgoing New Veterinarians, 1971-78, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University. Cornell Vet. 1979;69(4):345-55. PubMed PMID: 527344.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Locational profiles: incoming veterinary students and outgoing new veterinarians, 1971-78, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University. A1 - Thompson,J C,Jr PY - 1979/10/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1979/10/1/entrez SP - 345 EP - 55 JF - The Cornell veterinarian JO - Cornell Vet VL - 69 IS - 4 N2 - Relationships between the demographic areas of incoming veterinary students and first placement locations were examined during 1971-1978 for the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University. Seventy-four percent of the incoming students were New York residents whereas only 52 percent of the graduates selected New York sites for their first placement after graduation. Part of the net loss may be the result of temporary moves into the state to gain residence status, educational preparation and possibly some hope for improving admission eligibility. After completing their veterinary education, they are more likely to return to areas closely associated with family and childhood experiences for first placement choices or for advanced educational offerings. Three demographic classifications were used to identify patterns of movement into and out of the state (Urban, Suburban and Rural). No significant differences in area distribution patterns were observed between incoming and outgoing students/graduates. However, when the data were separated by sex, the outgoing distribution patterns were significantly different for female graduates (Urban and Rural areas preferred over Suburban). Sixty-five percent of the out-of-state placements were in New England and other Northeastern states, with Rural areas showing major strengths. SN - 0010-8901 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/527344/Locational_profiles:_incoming_veterinary_students_and_outgoing_new_veterinarians_1971_78_New_York_State_College_of_Veterinary_Medicine_Cornell_University_ L2 - http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.b4179405?urlappend=;seq=361 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -