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Relationship of hepatitis A antigen to viral hepatitis.

Abstract

Progress in research on hepatitis type A has begun to accelerate because of the recent discovery of an antigen associated specifically with hepatitis type A infection and the development of tests for antibody to the antigen. Hepatitis A antigen is associated with 27 nm virus-like particles found in the liver and stool of animals experimentally infected with hepatitis type A and in the stool of humans experimentally or naturally infected with the virus. The density of the particulate antigen when isolated from the liver is 1.34, but antigen particles with densities ranging from 1.32 to 1.40 have been detected in stool. However, antigens from the liver and from the stool appear to be antigenically related. Using immune electron microscopy as a serologic tool for detecting antibody to hepatitis A antigen, we detected antibody in convalescent sera from 100 per cent of patients experimentally or naturally infected with hepatitis type A. In contrast, patients with hepatitis type B or non-B hepatitis not epidemiologically compatible with a diagnosis of hepatitis type A did not have a serologic response to hepatitis A antigen. Antibody was found in approximately 50 per cent of normal individuals tested; the frequency was directly related to age. By the use of immune electron microscopy for the detection of hepatitis A antigen and antibody, the temporal relationship of antigen, antibody and liver damage was determined in experimentally infected humans and chimpanzees. On the basis of serologic comparisons, hepatitis type A does not appear to be related to experimental hepatitis caused by the GB agent of Deinhardt, nor is the hepatitis A antigen serologically related to the fecal antigen of Cross.

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    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Animals
    Antibodies, Viral
    Antigen-Antibody Complex
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Epitopes
    Feces
    Food Microbiology
    Guinea Pigs
    Haplorhini
    Hepatitis A
    Hepatitis B
    Hepatitis B Antigens
    Hepatitis B virus
    Hepatovirus
    Humans
    Infant
    Liver
    Middle Aged
    Pan troglodytes
    Transaminases

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    53012

    Citation

    Purcell, R H., et al. "Relationship of Hepatitis a Antigen to Viral Hepatitis." The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, vol. 270, no. 1, 1975, pp. 61-71.
    Purcell RH, Dienstag JL, Feinstone SM, et al. Relationship of hepatitis A antigen to viral hepatitis. Am J Med Sci. 1975;270(1):61-71.
    Purcell, R. H., Dienstag, J. L., Feinstone, S. M., & Kapikian, A. Z. (1975). Relationship of hepatitis A antigen to viral hepatitis. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 270(1), pp. 61-71.
    Purcell RH, et al. Relationship of Hepatitis a Antigen to Viral Hepatitis. Am J Med Sci. 1975;270(1):61-71. PubMed PMID: 53012.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship of hepatitis A antigen to viral hepatitis. AU - Purcell,R H, AU - Dienstag,J L, AU - Feinstone,S M, AU - Kapikian,A Z, PY - 1975/7/1/pubmed PY - 1975/7/1/medline PY - 1975/7/1/entrez SP - 61 EP - 71 JF - The American journal of the medical sciences JO - Am. J. Med. Sci. VL - 270 IS - 1 N2 - Progress in research on hepatitis type A has begun to accelerate because of the recent discovery of an antigen associated specifically with hepatitis type A infection and the development of tests for antibody to the antigen. Hepatitis A antigen is associated with 27 nm virus-like particles found in the liver and stool of animals experimentally infected with hepatitis type A and in the stool of humans experimentally or naturally infected with the virus. The density of the particulate antigen when isolated from the liver is 1.34, but antigen particles with densities ranging from 1.32 to 1.40 have been detected in stool. However, antigens from the liver and from the stool appear to be antigenically related. Using immune electron microscopy as a serologic tool for detecting antibody to hepatitis A antigen, we detected antibody in convalescent sera from 100 per cent of patients experimentally or naturally infected with hepatitis type A. In contrast, patients with hepatitis type B or non-B hepatitis not epidemiologically compatible with a diagnosis of hepatitis type A did not have a serologic response to hepatitis A antigen. Antibody was found in approximately 50 per cent of normal individuals tested; the frequency was directly related to age. By the use of immune electron microscopy for the detection of hepatitis A antigen and antibody, the temporal relationship of antigen, antibody and liver damage was determined in experimentally infected humans and chimpanzees. On the basis of serologic comparisons, hepatitis type A does not appear to be related to experimental hepatitis caused by the GB agent of Deinhardt, nor is the hepatitis A antigen serologically related to the fecal antigen of Cross. SN - 0002-9629 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/53012/Relationship_of_hepatitis_A_antigen_to_viral_hepatitis_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=53012.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -