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Problems with the serum vitamin B12 assay.
Lancet. 1980 Nov 15; 2(8203):1072-4.Lct

Abstract

Quality control trials have shown that, in routine practice, serum vitamin B12 estimations vary so much from laboratory to laboratory that serious confusion can result irrespective of whether microbiological or radioassay methods are used. Even experienced centres find the assay too insensitive and non-specific for a low level to be used as the sole criterion of vitamin B12 deficiency; the haemopoietic and biochemical sequelae of vitamin B12 deficiency also correlate poorly with the serum level. These basic difficulties with the assay seem to stem from the pattern of vitamin B12 (or cobalamin) binding in serum. Human beings are unique in having virtually all of their cobalamin attached to an apparently functionless binder, transcobalamin I. It is therefore not surprising that the serum cobalamin is such a poor predictor of cobalamin deficiency. The metabolically important serum binder is transcobalamin II and deficiency of this protein causes a potentially lethal megaloblastic anaemia even though the serum cobalamin level is normal. Tissue cobalamin depletion with normal serum levels also occurs after nitrous oxide inhalation and in certain inborn errors of metabolism.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6107691

Citation

England, J M., and J C. Linnell. "Problems With the Serum Vitamin B12 Assay." Lancet (London, England), vol. 2, no. 8203, 1980, pp. 1072-4.
England JM, Linnell JC. Problems with the serum vitamin B12 assay. Lancet. 1980;2(8203):1072-4.
England, J. M., & Linnell, J. C. (1980). Problems with the serum vitamin B12 assay. Lancet (London, England), 2(8203), 1072-4.
England JM, Linnell JC. Problems With the Serum Vitamin B12 Assay. Lancet. 1980 Nov 15;2(8203):1072-4. PubMed PMID: 6107691.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Problems with the serum vitamin B12 assay. AU - England,J M, AU - Linnell,J C, PY - 1980/11/15/pubmed PY - 1980/11/15/medline PY - 1980/11/15/entrez SP - 1072 EP - 4 JF - Lancet (London, England) JO - Lancet VL - 2 IS - 8203 N2 - Quality control trials have shown that, in routine practice, serum vitamin B12 estimations vary so much from laboratory to laboratory that serious confusion can result irrespective of whether microbiological or radioassay methods are used. Even experienced centres find the assay too insensitive and non-specific for a low level to be used as the sole criterion of vitamin B12 deficiency; the haemopoietic and biochemical sequelae of vitamin B12 deficiency also correlate poorly with the serum level. These basic difficulties with the assay seem to stem from the pattern of vitamin B12 (or cobalamin) binding in serum. Human beings are unique in having virtually all of their cobalamin attached to an apparently functionless binder, transcobalamin I. It is therefore not surprising that the serum cobalamin is such a poor predictor of cobalamin deficiency. The metabolically important serum binder is transcobalamin II and deficiency of this protein causes a potentially lethal megaloblastic anaemia even though the serum cobalamin level is normal. Tissue cobalamin depletion with normal serum levels also occurs after nitrous oxide inhalation and in certain inborn errors of metabolism. SN - 0140-6736 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6107691/Problems_with_the_serum_vitamin_B12_assay_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-6736(80)92287-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -