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Use of dichloromethylene diphosphonate in metastatic bone disease.
N Engl J Med. 1983 Jun 23; 308(25):1499-501.NEJM

Abstract

Dichloromethylene diphosphonate (clodronate), a new compound, has powerful activity against osteoclasts and has been used successfully to treat hypercalcemia associated with cancer. We studied its effects on calcium balance in patients with malignant osteolytic lesions. Ten normocalcemic patients with advanced metastatic bone disease or myeloma were evaluated in a baseline 20-day balance and calcium kinetic study. They were then randomized to a clodronate or placebo regimen, treated intravenously for two weeks and orally for a month, and finally reevaluated in another 20-day balance and kinetic study, conducted while they were still receiving treatment. The results show that both calcium balance and calcium absorption increased from base line in the clodronate group and that these changes were significantly different from those in the placebo group (mean change [+/- S.D.] in calcium balance [clodronate vs. placebo], 203.8 +/- 140.1 vs. -65.2 +/- 98.8 mg [5.1 +/- 3.5 vs. -1.6 +/- 2.5 mmol] of calcium per day, P less than 0.01; change in calcium absorption, 158.8 +/- 158 vs. -38.2 +/- 96.0 mg [4.0 +/- 4.0 vs. -1.0 +/- 2.4 mmol] per day, P less than 0.05). There was a marginal decrease in bone resorption in the clodronate group and no change in bone accretion. Our results suggest that clodronate may be a useful adjuvant in managing metastatic bone disease.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6222257

Citation

Jung, A, et al. "Use of Dichloromethylene Diphosphonate in Metastatic Bone Disease." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 308, no. 25, 1983, pp. 1499-501.
Jung A, Chantraine A, Donath A, et al. Use of dichloromethylene diphosphonate in metastatic bone disease. N Engl J Med. 1983;308(25):1499-501.
Jung, A., Chantraine, A., Donath, A., van Ouwenaller, C., Turnill, D., Mermillod, B., & Kitler, M. E. (1983). Use of dichloromethylene diphosphonate in metastatic bone disease. The New England Journal of Medicine, 308(25), 1499-501.
Jung A, et al. Use of Dichloromethylene Diphosphonate in Metastatic Bone Disease. N Engl J Med. 1983 Jun 23;308(25):1499-501. PubMed PMID: 6222257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of dichloromethylene diphosphonate in metastatic bone disease. AU - Jung,A, AU - Chantraine,A, AU - Donath,A, AU - van Ouwenaller,C, AU - Turnill,D, AU - Mermillod,B, AU - Kitler,M E, PY - 1983/6/23/pubmed PY - 1983/6/23/medline PY - 1983/6/23/entrez SP - 1499 EP - 501 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N Engl J Med VL - 308 IS - 25 N2 - Dichloromethylene diphosphonate (clodronate), a new compound, has powerful activity against osteoclasts and has been used successfully to treat hypercalcemia associated with cancer. We studied its effects on calcium balance in patients with malignant osteolytic lesions. Ten normocalcemic patients with advanced metastatic bone disease or myeloma were evaluated in a baseline 20-day balance and calcium kinetic study. They were then randomized to a clodronate or placebo regimen, treated intravenously for two weeks and orally for a month, and finally reevaluated in another 20-day balance and kinetic study, conducted while they were still receiving treatment. The results show that both calcium balance and calcium absorption increased from base line in the clodronate group and that these changes were significantly different from those in the placebo group (mean change [+/- S.D.] in calcium balance [clodronate vs. placebo], 203.8 +/- 140.1 vs. -65.2 +/- 98.8 mg [5.1 +/- 3.5 vs. -1.6 +/- 2.5 mmol] of calcium per day, P less than 0.01; change in calcium absorption, 158.8 +/- 158 vs. -38.2 +/- 96.0 mg [4.0 +/- 4.0 vs. -1.0 +/- 2.4 mmol] per day, P less than 0.05). There was a marginal decrease in bone resorption in the clodronate group and no change in bone accretion. Our results suggest that clodronate may be a useful adjuvant in managing metastatic bone disease. SN - 0028-4793 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6222257/Use_of_dichloromethylene_diphosphonate_in_metastatic_bone_disease_ L2 - https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJM198306233082503?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -