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Transposition of yeast mating type genes from two translocations of the left arm of chromosome III.
Mol Cell Biol. 1981 Dec; 1(12):1106-19.MC

Abstract

In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HIS4C gene lies on the left arm of chromosome III. We analyzed two chromosomal rearrangements that have HIS4C translocated either to chromosome XII or to a new translocation chromosome. Using the cmt mutation that allows expression of the normally silent copies of mating type genes, we found that both of these translocations also carried HML alpha, more than 30 map units distal to HIS4C which normally lies on chromosome III. In the case of the translocation chromosome (designated T3), we also found an exchange event between HML alpha on the translocation chromosome and HMLa on chromosome III. In diploids containing two T3 chromosomes (one carrying HML alpha and the carrying HMLa), we found that HML was 32 centimorgans from HIS4C, which was 10 centimorgans from an unknown centromere. In homothallic strains carrying HMLa MATa HMRa on chromosome III, switching from MATa to MAT alpha could occur by using the HML alpha on the translocation as the sole donor of alpha information. Transposition from HML alpha on chromosome T3 was about 20 to 40% as efficient as transposition from intact chromosome III. In contrast, transposition from the HML alpha inserted into chromosome XII was reduced about 100-fold. This reduced efficiency did not appear to be caused by an alteration in the sequences immediately surrounding HML alpha in the translocation. The translocated HML alpha sequence was located in the same size (29-kilobase) SalI fragment as was found in chromosome III, and the same EcoRI, HindIII, and BglII restriction sites were also found. Furthermore, HML alpha was still under the control of the CMT gene, which maintains HML as a silent copy of mating type information. These results suggested that the position of the HML alpha sequence plays an important role in the efficiency of mating type switching.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6287218

Citation

Haber, J E., et al. "Transposition of Yeast Mating Type Genes From Two Translocations of the Left Arm of Chromosome III." Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 1, no. 12, 1981, pp. 1106-19.
Haber JE, Rowe L, Rogers DT. Transposition of yeast mating type genes from two translocations of the left arm of chromosome III. Mol Cell Biol. 1981;1(12):1106-19.
Haber, J. E., Rowe, L., & Rogers, D. T. (1981). Transposition of yeast mating type genes from two translocations of the left arm of chromosome III. Molecular and Cellular Biology, 1(12), 1106-19.
Haber JE, Rowe L, Rogers DT. Transposition of Yeast Mating Type Genes From Two Translocations of the Left Arm of Chromosome III. Mol Cell Biol. 1981;1(12):1106-19. PubMed PMID: 6287218.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transposition of yeast mating type genes from two translocations of the left arm of chromosome III. AU - Haber,J E, AU - Rowe,L, AU - Rogers,D T, PY - 1981/12/1/pubmed PY - 1981/12/1/medline PY - 1981/12/1/entrez SP - 1106 EP - 19 JF - Molecular and cellular biology JO - Mol Cell Biol VL - 1 IS - 12 N2 - In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HIS4C gene lies on the left arm of chromosome III. We analyzed two chromosomal rearrangements that have HIS4C translocated either to chromosome XII or to a new translocation chromosome. Using the cmt mutation that allows expression of the normally silent copies of mating type genes, we found that both of these translocations also carried HML alpha, more than 30 map units distal to HIS4C which normally lies on chromosome III. In the case of the translocation chromosome (designated T3), we also found an exchange event between HML alpha on the translocation chromosome and HMLa on chromosome III. In diploids containing two T3 chromosomes (one carrying HML alpha and the carrying HMLa), we found that HML was 32 centimorgans from HIS4C, which was 10 centimorgans from an unknown centromere. In homothallic strains carrying HMLa MATa HMRa on chromosome III, switching from MATa to MAT alpha could occur by using the HML alpha on the translocation as the sole donor of alpha information. Transposition from HML alpha on chromosome T3 was about 20 to 40% as efficient as transposition from intact chromosome III. In contrast, transposition from the HML alpha inserted into chromosome XII was reduced about 100-fold. This reduced efficiency did not appear to be caused by an alteration in the sequences immediately surrounding HML alpha in the translocation. The translocated HML alpha sequence was located in the same size (29-kilobase) SalI fragment as was found in chromosome III, and the same EcoRI, HindIII, and BglII restriction sites were also found. Furthermore, HML alpha was still under the control of the CMT gene, which maintains HML as a silent copy of mating type information. These results suggested that the position of the HML alpha sequence plays an important role in the efficiency of mating type switching. SN - 0270-7306 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6287218/Transposition_of_yeast_mating_type_genes_from_two_translocations_of_the_left_arm_of_chromosome_III_ L2 - https://journals.asm.org/doi/10.1128/mcb.1.12.1106-1119.1981?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -