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Ankylosing spondylitis and inflammatory bowel disease. II. Prevalence of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease.
Ann Rheum Dis. 1978 Feb; 37(1):33-5.AR

Abstract

To establish the prevalence of peripheral arthritis, radiographic sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 58 consecutive patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) and 51 with Crohn's disease (CD) underwent a detailed rheumatological examination. In addition, all patients were screened for the presence of the antigen HLA B27. Peripheral arthritis was found in 14 (8 UC, 6 CD) patients (12.8%); radiographic sacroiliitis was diagnosed in 11 (5 UC, 6 CD) (10.1%), of whom 10 were asymptomatic; and ankylosing spondylitis was diagnosed in 2 UC and 2 CD patients (3.7%). 18.9% of the UC and 3.9% of the CD patients were HLA B27 positive. One of the 11 patients with radiographic sacroiliitis and 2 of the 4 with ankylosing spondylitis had the HLA B27 antigen. Peripheral arthritis, radiographic sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis are apparently frequent manifestations in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. Asymptomatic radiographic sacroiliitis in these patients appears to differ from idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis, both clinically and genetically. Evaluation of subjective rheumatological complaints, necessary for a confident diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, according to the New York criteria is difficult during a flare-up of the inflammatory bowel process, as was shown in 4 CD cases with marked limitation of lumbovertebral function and chest expansion, but no radiological abnormalities of the SI joints.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

629601

Citation

Dekker-Saeys, B J., et al. "Ankylosing Spondylitis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. II. Prevalence of Peripheral Arthritis, Sacroiliitis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis in Patients Suffering From Inflammatory Bowel Disease." Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 37, no. 1, 1978, pp. 33-5.
Dekker-Saeys BJ, Meuwissen SG, Van Den Berg-Loonen EM, et al. Ankylosing spondylitis and inflammatory bowel disease. II. Prevalence of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. Ann Rheum Dis. 1978;37(1):33-5.
Dekker-Saeys, B. J., Meuwissen, S. G., Van Den Berg-Loonen, E. M., De Haas, W. H., Agenant, D., & Tytgat, G. N. (1978). Ankylosing spondylitis and inflammatory bowel disease. II. Prevalence of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 37(1), 33-5.
Dekker-Saeys BJ, et al. Ankylosing Spondylitis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. II. Prevalence of Peripheral Arthritis, Sacroiliitis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis in Patients Suffering From Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Ann Rheum Dis. 1978;37(1):33-5. PubMed PMID: 629601.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ankylosing spondylitis and inflammatory bowel disease. II. Prevalence of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. AU - Dekker-Saeys,B J, AU - Meuwissen,S G, AU - Van Den Berg-Loonen,E M, AU - De Haas,W H, AU - Agenant,D, AU - Tytgat,G N, PY - 1978/2/1/pubmed PY - 1978/2/1/medline PY - 1978/2/1/entrez SP - 33 EP - 5 JF - Annals of the rheumatic diseases JO - Ann Rheum Dis VL - 37 IS - 1 N2 - To establish the prevalence of peripheral arthritis, radiographic sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 58 consecutive patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) and 51 with Crohn's disease (CD) underwent a detailed rheumatological examination. In addition, all patients were screened for the presence of the antigen HLA B27. Peripheral arthritis was found in 14 (8 UC, 6 CD) patients (12.8%); radiographic sacroiliitis was diagnosed in 11 (5 UC, 6 CD) (10.1%), of whom 10 were asymptomatic; and ankylosing spondylitis was diagnosed in 2 UC and 2 CD patients (3.7%). 18.9% of the UC and 3.9% of the CD patients were HLA B27 positive. One of the 11 patients with radiographic sacroiliitis and 2 of the 4 with ankylosing spondylitis had the HLA B27 antigen. Peripheral arthritis, radiographic sacroiliitis, and ankylosing spondylitis are apparently frequent manifestations in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. Asymptomatic radiographic sacroiliitis in these patients appears to differ from idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis, both clinically and genetically. Evaluation of subjective rheumatological complaints, necessary for a confident diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, according to the New York criteria is difficult during a flare-up of the inflammatory bowel process, as was shown in 4 CD cases with marked limitation of lumbovertebral function and chest expansion, but no radiological abnormalities of the SI joints. SN - 0003-4967 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/629601/Ankylosing_spondylitis_and_inflammatory_bowel_disease__II__Prevalence_of_peripheral_arthritis_sacroiliitis_and_ankylosing_spondylitis_in_patients_suffering_from_inflammatory_bowel_disease_ L2 - https://ard.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=629601 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -