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Lithium chloride: protective and antisecretory properties in rats.
Gastroenterology. 1984 Aug; 87(2):362-71.G

Abstract

Lithium chloride was evaluated as a potential protective agent against ethanol-induced hemorrhagic gastritis in rats. Rats received lithium chloride intragastrically (30, 60, or 90 mg/kg i.g.) or subcutaneously (3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, or 90 mg/kg s.c.), or a placebo (H2O i.g. or 0.9% NaCl s.c.). Ninety minutes later 1 cm3 of 95% ethanol was administered intragastrically. After 30 min, the rats were killed and their stomachs were removed and visually scored for gross hemorrhagic gastritis. Lithium chloride at all doses less than 3 mg/kg significantly improved hemorrhagic gastritis when compared with the placebo. Moreover, rats treated with lithium chloride intragastrically had significantly less hemorrhagic gastritis than those treated subcutaneously even though serum lithium levels were similar. To determine if lithium's protective properties related to acid inhibition, pylorus-ligated and gastric fistula rats were studied. The median effective dose for lithium chloride was 20-30 mg/kg and the nonantisecretory dose was 3 mg/kg. No difference in hemorrhagic gastritis was noted between controls and animals receiving the nonantisecretory dose. However, at higher doses (LiCl 30, 60, and 90 mg/kg), lithium's protective properties persisted in spite of adding 150 mM HCl to the intragastrically administered ethanol (p less than 0.001). To determine further if lithium chloride stimulated endogenous prostaglandins, indomethacin, a prostaglandin inhibitor, was administered. Indomethacin did not alter lithium chloride's protective properties. In fact, when compared with exogenously administered 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (5 and 500 micrograms/kg), high-dose LiCl (30, 60, or 90 mg/kg) resulted in significantly more protection against ethanol-induced injury (p less than 0.001). In contrast, when both nonantisecretory doses were compared, 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (5 micrograms/kg) gave significantly better protection than LiCl (3 mg/kg). These data indicate that LiCl is a potent gastric antisecretory and protective agent. The protective properties of LiCl appear to be related to acid inhibition and be independent of endogenous prostaglandins, although other protective mechanisms may be present at higher LiCl doses. Additionally, this study indicates that LiCl may have clinical application in protecting the gastric mucosa against hemorrhagic gastritis.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6329891

Citation

Wong, R K., et al. "Lithium Chloride: Protective and Antisecretory Properties in Rats." Gastroenterology, vol. 87, no. 2, 1984, pp. 362-71.
Wong RK, Boedeker B, Hickey TM, et al. Lithium chloride: protective and antisecretory properties in rats. Gastroenterology. 1984;87(2):362-71.
Wong, R. K., Boedeker, B., Hickey, T. M., Wilkinson, D. S., & Johnson, L. F. (1984). Lithium chloride: protective and antisecretory properties in rats. Gastroenterology, 87(2), 362-71.
Wong RK, et al. Lithium Chloride: Protective and Antisecretory Properties in Rats. Gastroenterology. 1984;87(2):362-71. PubMed PMID: 6329891.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lithium chloride: protective and antisecretory properties in rats. AU - Wong,R K, AU - Boedeker,B, AU - Hickey,T M, AU - Wilkinson,D S, AU - Johnson,L F, PY - 1984/8/1/pubmed PY - 1984/8/1/medline PY - 1984/8/1/entrez SP - 362 EP - 71 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 87 IS - 2 N2 - Lithium chloride was evaluated as a potential protective agent against ethanol-induced hemorrhagic gastritis in rats. Rats received lithium chloride intragastrically (30, 60, or 90 mg/kg i.g.) or subcutaneously (3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, or 90 mg/kg s.c.), or a placebo (H2O i.g. or 0.9% NaCl s.c.). Ninety minutes later 1 cm3 of 95% ethanol was administered intragastrically. After 30 min, the rats were killed and their stomachs were removed and visually scored for gross hemorrhagic gastritis. Lithium chloride at all doses less than 3 mg/kg significantly improved hemorrhagic gastritis when compared with the placebo. Moreover, rats treated with lithium chloride intragastrically had significantly less hemorrhagic gastritis than those treated subcutaneously even though serum lithium levels were similar. To determine if lithium's protective properties related to acid inhibition, pylorus-ligated and gastric fistula rats were studied. The median effective dose for lithium chloride was 20-30 mg/kg and the nonantisecretory dose was 3 mg/kg. No difference in hemorrhagic gastritis was noted between controls and animals receiving the nonantisecretory dose. However, at higher doses (LiCl 30, 60, and 90 mg/kg), lithium's protective properties persisted in spite of adding 150 mM HCl to the intragastrically administered ethanol (p less than 0.001). To determine further if lithium chloride stimulated endogenous prostaglandins, indomethacin, a prostaglandin inhibitor, was administered. Indomethacin did not alter lithium chloride's protective properties. In fact, when compared with exogenously administered 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (5 and 500 micrograms/kg), high-dose LiCl (30, 60, or 90 mg/kg) resulted in significantly more protection against ethanol-induced injury (p less than 0.001). In contrast, when both nonantisecretory doses were compared, 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (5 micrograms/kg) gave significantly better protection than LiCl (3 mg/kg). These data indicate that LiCl is a potent gastric antisecretory and protective agent. The protective properties of LiCl appear to be related to acid inhibition and be independent of endogenous prostaglandins, although other protective mechanisms may be present at higher LiCl doses. Additionally, this study indicates that LiCl may have clinical application in protecting the gastric mucosa against hemorrhagic gastritis. SN - 0016-5085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6329891/Lithium_chloride:_protective_and_antisecretory_properties_in_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016508584001803 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -