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A prospective randomized study of effect of proximal gastric vagotomy and vagotomy and antrectomy on bile reflux, endoscopic mucosal abnormalities and gastritis.
Surg Gastroenterol. 1984; 3(2):54-9.SG

Abstract

71 patients participated in a double-blind trial which compared proximal gastric vagotomy (PVG) with vagotomy and antrectomy (V & A). 82 percent of the patients subsequently volunteered for endoscopy 6 to 12 months after operation and 65 percent for measurement of fasting bile reflux (FBR) and peak acid output (PAO). The results of these follow-up assessments are given in this paper. None of the 36 patients who had undergone V & A had a recurrent ulcer; in contrast ulcers or fresh scars were found in 5 of 35 patients after PGV, even in 2 who had no symptoms. Erythema of the gastric mucosa was seen more commonly after V & A than PGV. Such erythema was associated with high levels of fasting bile reflux (an objective measure of reflux of bile into the stomach) and with symptoms of bile vomiting and mild epigastric pain. High levels of fasting bile reflux were not found after PGV. Histological gastritis of the proximal stomach was equally common after both operations in patients without a recurrent ulcer. Gastritis was not related to endoscopic mucosal erythema or fasting bile reflux, but did correlate with peak acid output. These results confirm that bile reflux is associated with mucosal erythema and symptoms after V & A but that significant bile reflux does not occur after PGV. However, bile reflux is not related to gastritis, which appears to be the result of an operation (either PGV or V & A) which successfully reduces peak acid output.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6400388

Citation

Hoare, A M., et al. "A Prospective Randomized Study of Effect of Proximal Gastric Vagotomy and Vagotomy and Antrectomy On Bile Reflux, Endoscopic Mucosal Abnormalities and Gastritis." Surgical Gastroenterology, vol. 3, no. 2, 1984, pp. 54-9.
Hoare AM, Donovan IA, Keighley MR, et al. A prospective randomized study of effect of proximal gastric vagotomy and vagotomy and antrectomy on bile reflux, endoscopic mucosal abnormalities and gastritis. Surg Gastroenterol. 1984;3(2):54-9.
Hoare, A. M., Donovan, I. A., Keighley, M. R., Thompson, H., Dorricott, N. J., & Alexander-Williams, J. (1984). A prospective randomized study of effect of proximal gastric vagotomy and vagotomy and antrectomy on bile reflux, endoscopic mucosal abnormalities and gastritis. Surgical Gastroenterology, 3(2), 54-9.
Hoare AM, et al. A Prospective Randomized Study of Effect of Proximal Gastric Vagotomy and Vagotomy and Antrectomy On Bile Reflux, Endoscopic Mucosal Abnormalities and Gastritis. Surg Gastroenterol. 1984;3(2):54-9. PubMed PMID: 6400388.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective randomized study of effect of proximal gastric vagotomy and vagotomy and antrectomy on bile reflux, endoscopic mucosal abnormalities and gastritis. AU - Hoare,A M, AU - Donovan,I A, AU - Keighley,M R, AU - Thompson,H, AU - Dorricott,N J, AU - Alexander-Williams,J, PY - 1984/1/1/pubmed PY - 1984/1/1/medline PY - 1984/1/1/entrez SP - 54 EP - 9 JF - Surgical gastroenterology JO - Surg Gastroenterol VL - 3 IS - 2 N2 - 71 patients participated in a double-blind trial which compared proximal gastric vagotomy (PVG) with vagotomy and antrectomy (V & A). 82 percent of the patients subsequently volunteered for endoscopy 6 to 12 months after operation and 65 percent for measurement of fasting bile reflux (FBR) and peak acid output (PAO). The results of these follow-up assessments are given in this paper. None of the 36 patients who had undergone V & A had a recurrent ulcer; in contrast ulcers or fresh scars were found in 5 of 35 patients after PGV, even in 2 who had no symptoms. Erythema of the gastric mucosa was seen more commonly after V & A than PGV. Such erythema was associated with high levels of fasting bile reflux (an objective measure of reflux of bile into the stomach) and with symptoms of bile vomiting and mild epigastric pain. High levels of fasting bile reflux were not found after PGV. Histological gastritis of the proximal stomach was equally common after both operations in patients without a recurrent ulcer. Gastritis was not related to endoscopic mucosal erythema or fasting bile reflux, but did correlate with peak acid output. These results confirm that bile reflux is associated with mucosal erythema and symptoms after V & A but that significant bile reflux does not occur after PGV. However, bile reflux is not related to gastritis, which appears to be the result of an operation (either PGV or V & A) which successfully reduces peak acid output. SN - 0730-2681 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6400388/A_prospective_randomized_study_of_effect_of_proximal_gastric_vagotomy_and_vagotomy_and_antrectomy_on_bile_reflux_endoscopic_mucosal_abnormalities_and_gastritis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -