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[7 cases of calyceal diverticula in children].
Chir Pediatr. 1983; 24(1):45-9.CP

Abstract

Seven cases of calyceal diverticula were seen from 1967 to 1981 in children aged 2 to 16 years at the moment of diagnosis. Symptoms were: gross hematuria (2 cases), urinary infection (2 cases), recurrent abdominal pain (2 cases) or enuresia. All children had a single diverticulum. Five of the 7 diverticula were located at upper renal pole. One of the children presenting with hematuria and renal colic had an oxalic calculous within diverticulum. Three small diverticula did not require treatment and remained uncomplicated with a follow-up of 14,18 and 60 months. Four complicated diverticula (1 from oxalolithiasis, 1 from hematuria and 2 from urinary infection) required surgical removal, by partial nephrectomy (1 case) or deroofing operation with intradiverticular ligation of the communication channel (3 cases). Results were good in 3 children. Removal of adjacent parenchyma with a residual cavity was necessary 5 years later in the fourth child. The majority of children calyceal diverticula seem to be from congenital origin, but some authors suggest that the y could result from vesico-tubular reflux. The possibility of late complications from small and asymptomatic diverticula has been emphasized by many authors. The deroofing operation is certainly the elective procedure when a large or complicated diverticulum requires surgical treatment.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

6406084

Citation

Gauthier, F, et al. "[7 Cases of Calyceal Diverticula in Children]." Chirurgie Pediatrique, vol. 24, no. 1, 1983, pp. 45-9.
Gauthier F, Montupet P, Valayer J. [7 cases of calyceal diverticula in children]. Chir Pediatr. 1983;24(1):45-9.
Gauthier, F., Montupet, P., & Valayer, J. (1983). [7 cases of calyceal diverticula in children]. Chirurgie Pediatrique, 24(1), 45-9.
Gauthier F, Montupet P, Valayer J. [7 Cases of Calyceal Diverticula in Children]. Chir Pediatr. 1983;24(1):45-9. PubMed PMID: 6406084.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [7 cases of calyceal diverticula in children]. AU - Gauthier,F, AU - Montupet,P, AU - Valayer,J, PY - 1983/1/1/pubmed PY - 1983/1/1/medline PY - 1983/1/1/entrez SP - 45 EP - 9 JF - Chirurgie pediatrique JO - Chir Pediatr VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - Seven cases of calyceal diverticula were seen from 1967 to 1981 in children aged 2 to 16 years at the moment of diagnosis. Symptoms were: gross hematuria (2 cases), urinary infection (2 cases), recurrent abdominal pain (2 cases) or enuresia. All children had a single diverticulum. Five of the 7 diverticula were located at upper renal pole. One of the children presenting with hematuria and renal colic had an oxalic calculous within diverticulum. Three small diverticula did not require treatment and remained uncomplicated with a follow-up of 14,18 and 60 months. Four complicated diverticula (1 from oxalolithiasis, 1 from hematuria and 2 from urinary infection) required surgical removal, by partial nephrectomy (1 case) or deroofing operation with intradiverticular ligation of the communication channel (3 cases). Results were good in 3 children. Removal of adjacent parenchyma with a residual cavity was necessary 5 years later in the fourth child. The majority of children calyceal diverticula seem to be from congenital origin, but some authors suggest that the y could result from vesico-tubular reflux. The possibility of late complications from small and asymptomatic diverticula has been emphasized by many authors. The deroofing operation is certainly the elective procedure when a large or complicated diverticulum requires surgical treatment. SN - 0180-5738 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6406084/[7_cases_of_calyceal_diverticula_in_children]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/kidneydiseases.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -