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Historical aspects of minerals and vitamins in parenteral nutrition.
Fed Proc 1984; 43(5):1412-6FP

Abstract

Advances in knowledge of the requirements for vitamins and minerals have been essential in the success of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for improving or maintaining good nutritional status for increasing periods of time. The availability of all known vitamins by the late 1940's and advances in vitamin technology resulted in stable single-vitamin or multivitamin solutions for i.v. use. Improved physician experience in vitamin usage and modified and more complete formulations are reflected in improved patient treatment. However, requirements for certain vitamins in hypermetabolic states and for prolonged use remain to be elucidated. TPN has also focused attention on the needs for macro- and microminerals. It has emphasized the importance of electrolytes, including inorganic phosphate, in human nutrition. Changes in the sources of amino acids from protein hydrolysates to crystalline amino acids have resulted in increasingly purified solutions essentially free of trace elements. This has focused attention on human requirements and the need for provision of increasing numbers of these ions.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6423411

Citation

Shils, M E.. "Historical Aspects of Minerals and Vitamins in Parenteral Nutrition." Federation Proceedings, vol. 43, no. 5, 1984, pp. 1412-6.
Shils ME. Historical aspects of minerals and vitamins in parenteral nutrition. Fed Proc. 1984;43(5):1412-6.
Shils, M. E. (1984). Historical aspects of minerals and vitamins in parenteral nutrition. Federation Proceedings, 43(5), pp. 1412-6.
Shils ME. Historical Aspects of Minerals and Vitamins in Parenteral Nutrition. Fed Proc. 1984;43(5):1412-6. PubMed PMID: 6423411.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Historical aspects of minerals and vitamins in parenteral nutrition. A1 - Shils,M E, PY - 1984/4/1/pubmed PY - 1984/4/1/medline PY - 1984/4/1/entrez SP - 1412 EP - 6 JF - Federation proceedings JO - Fed. Proc. VL - 43 IS - 5 N2 - Advances in knowledge of the requirements for vitamins and minerals have been essential in the success of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for improving or maintaining good nutritional status for increasing periods of time. The availability of all known vitamins by the late 1940's and advances in vitamin technology resulted in stable single-vitamin or multivitamin solutions for i.v. use. Improved physician experience in vitamin usage and modified and more complete formulations are reflected in improved patient treatment. However, requirements for certain vitamins in hypermetabolic states and for prolonged use remain to be elucidated. TPN has also focused attention on the needs for macro- and microminerals. It has emphasized the importance of electrolytes, including inorganic phosphate, in human nutrition. Changes in the sources of amino acids from protein hydrolysates to crystalline amino acids have resulted in increasingly purified solutions essentially free of trace elements. This has focused attention on human requirements and the need for provision of increasing numbers of these ions. SN - 0014-9446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6423411/Historical_aspects_of_minerals_and_vitamins_in_parenteral_nutrition_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/minerals.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -