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Enzyme replacement therapy for primary adult lactase deficiency. Effective reduction of lactose malabsorption and milk intolerance by direct addition of beta-galactosidase to milk at mealtime.
Gastroenterology 1984; 87(5):1072-82G

Abstract

The addition of microbial beta-galactosidases directly to milk at mealtime represents a potential "enzyme replacement therapy" for primary lactase deficiency. We used the hydrogen breath test as the index of incomplete carbohydrate absorption to assess the efficacy of two enzymes--one from yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis (LactAid), and the other from the fungus Aspergillus niger (Lactase N)--to assist in the hydrolysis of 18 g of lactose in 360 ml (12 oz) of whole milk when consumed by an adult lactose malabsorber. Graded amounts of Lactase N produced, at best, a 53% relative reduction in breath hydrogen excretion, whereas quantitative elimination of excess hydrogen excretion was produced by 1 and 1.5 g of LactAid. A double-blind, controlled, crossover trial was subsequently performed in 50 healthy, unselected Mexican adults, to whom 360 ml of cow's milk was presented in the three forms in a randomized order: intact milk, prehydrolyzed milk, and milk to which 1 g of LactAid was added immediately before consumption. Among the 25 subjects with incomplete carbohydrate absorption with intact milk, adding enzyme 5-min before consumption produced a 62% reduction in breath hydrogen excretion, and symptoms of intolerance were significantly reduced. The feasibility of effective enzyme replacement therapy with a beta-galactosidase from K. lactis is demonstrated.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6434367

Citation

Rosado, J L., et al. "Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Primary Adult Lactase Deficiency. Effective Reduction of Lactose Malabsorption and Milk Intolerance By Direct Addition of Beta-galactosidase to Milk at Mealtime." Gastroenterology, vol. 87, no. 5, 1984, pp. 1072-82.
Rosado JL, Solomons NW, Lisker R, et al. Enzyme replacement therapy for primary adult lactase deficiency. Effective reduction of lactose malabsorption and milk intolerance by direct addition of beta-galactosidase to milk at mealtime. Gastroenterology. 1984;87(5):1072-82.
Rosado, J. L., Solomons, N. W., Lisker, R., & Bourges, H. (1984). Enzyme replacement therapy for primary adult lactase deficiency. Effective reduction of lactose malabsorption and milk intolerance by direct addition of beta-galactosidase to milk at mealtime. Gastroenterology, 87(5), pp. 1072-82.
Rosado JL, et al. Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Primary Adult Lactase Deficiency. Effective Reduction of Lactose Malabsorption and Milk Intolerance By Direct Addition of Beta-galactosidase to Milk at Mealtime. Gastroenterology. 1984;87(5):1072-82. PubMed PMID: 6434367.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Enzyme replacement therapy for primary adult lactase deficiency. Effective reduction of lactose malabsorption and milk intolerance by direct addition of beta-galactosidase to milk at mealtime. AU - Rosado,J L, AU - Solomons,N W, AU - Lisker,R, AU - Bourges,H, PY - 1984/11/1/pubmed PY - 1984/11/1/medline PY - 1984/11/1/entrez SP - 1072 EP - 82 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 87 IS - 5 N2 - The addition of microbial beta-galactosidases directly to milk at mealtime represents a potential "enzyme replacement therapy" for primary lactase deficiency. We used the hydrogen breath test as the index of incomplete carbohydrate absorption to assess the efficacy of two enzymes--one from yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis (LactAid), and the other from the fungus Aspergillus niger (Lactase N)--to assist in the hydrolysis of 18 g of lactose in 360 ml (12 oz) of whole milk when consumed by an adult lactose malabsorber. Graded amounts of Lactase N produced, at best, a 53% relative reduction in breath hydrogen excretion, whereas quantitative elimination of excess hydrogen excretion was produced by 1 and 1.5 g of LactAid. A double-blind, controlled, crossover trial was subsequently performed in 50 healthy, unselected Mexican adults, to whom 360 ml of cow's milk was presented in the three forms in a randomized order: intact milk, prehydrolyzed milk, and milk to which 1 g of LactAid was added immediately before consumption. Among the 25 subjects with incomplete carbohydrate absorption with intact milk, adding enzyme 5-min before consumption produced a 62% reduction in breath hydrogen excretion, and symptoms of intolerance were significantly reduced. The feasibility of effective enzyme replacement therapy with a beta-galactosidase from K. lactis is demonstrated. SN - 0016-5085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6434367/Enzyme_replacement_therapy_for_primary_adult_lactase_deficiency__Effective_reduction_of_lactose_malabsorption_and_milk_intolerance_by_direct_addition_of_beta_galactosidase_to_milk_at_mealtime_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S001650858400281X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -