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Pregnancy outcome in 303 cases with severe preeclampsia.
Obstet Gynecol. 1984 Sep; 64(3):319-25.OG

Abstract

The purpose of the present clinical investigation was to determine the influence of aggressive management, associated medical/obstetric complications, race, and gestational age on fetal, neonatal, and maternal risks associated with severe preeclampsia. Three hundred and three consecutive pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia were studied. All patients were delivered within 48 hours after admission to the perinatal center. In 91 patients the disease was superimposed on chronic hypertension. There was a significant difference between patients with and those without prior chronic hypertension regarding perinatal mortality (32 versus 7.7%), incidence of abruptio placentae (10 versus 4%), and frequency of small-for-gestational-age infants (33 versus 14%). Fifty-one patients (17%) had thrombocytopenia, 26 (8.5%) had hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome, and 22 (7.3%) had disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. There was significant difference between white and black patients regarding the frequency of thrombocytopenia (28 versus 13%), hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome (19.7 versus 5.3%), and coagulopathy (13 versus 1.4%). However, most of this apparent racial difference resulted from higher incidence of abnormal hematologic findings among patients who had conservative management by private physicians before transfer. Perinatal survival was zero when severe preeclampsia developed at or before 28 weeks, whereas it was 100% when disease developed after 36 weeks' gestation. The above factors should be considered in counselling patients with severe preeclampsia.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6462561

Citation

Sibai, B M., et al. "Pregnancy Outcome in 303 Cases With Severe Preeclampsia." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 64, no. 3, 1984, pp. 319-25.
Sibai BM, Spinnato JA, Watson DL, et al. Pregnancy outcome in 303 cases with severe preeclampsia. Obstet Gynecol. 1984;64(3):319-25.
Sibai, B. M., Spinnato, J. A., Watson, D. L., Hill, G. A., & Anderson, G. D. (1984). Pregnancy outcome in 303 cases with severe preeclampsia. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 64(3), 319-25.
Sibai BM, et al. Pregnancy Outcome in 303 Cases With Severe Preeclampsia. Obstet Gynecol. 1984;64(3):319-25. PubMed PMID: 6462561.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pregnancy outcome in 303 cases with severe preeclampsia. AU - Sibai,B M, AU - Spinnato,J A, AU - Watson,D L, AU - Hill,G A, AU - Anderson,G D, PY - 1984/9/1/pubmed PY - 1984/9/1/medline PY - 1984/9/1/entrez SP - 319 EP - 25 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 64 IS - 3 N2 - The purpose of the present clinical investigation was to determine the influence of aggressive management, associated medical/obstetric complications, race, and gestational age on fetal, neonatal, and maternal risks associated with severe preeclampsia. Three hundred and three consecutive pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia were studied. All patients were delivered within 48 hours after admission to the perinatal center. In 91 patients the disease was superimposed on chronic hypertension. There was a significant difference between patients with and those without prior chronic hypertension regarding perinatal mortality (32 versus 7.7%), incidence of abruptio placentae (10 versus 4%), and frequency of small-for-gestational-age infants (33 versus 14%). Fifty-one patients (17%) had thrombocytopenia, 26 (8.5%) had hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome, and 22 (7.3%) had disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. There was significant difference between white and black patients regarding the frequency of thrombocytopenia (28 versus 13%), hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome (19.7 versus 5.3%), and coagulopathy (13 versus 1.4%). However, most of this apparent racial difference resulted from higher incidence of abnormal hematologic findings among patients who had conservative management by private physicians before transfer. Perinatal survival was zero when severe preeclampsia developed at or before 28 weeks, whereas it was 100% when disease developed after 36 weeks' gestation. The above factors should be considered in counselling patients with severe preeclampsia. SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6462561/Pregnancy_outcome_in_303_cases_with_severe_preeclampsia_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -