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Episodes of illness in breast-fed and bottle-fed infants in Jerusalem.
Isr J Med Sci 1984; 20(5):395-9IJ

Abstract

In a prospective study on breast-feeding in Jerusalem, 274 middle-class Jewish women were interviewed about their breast-feeding practices, and symptoms and signs of disease, episodes of illness and hospitalization of the infant. Women of a higher education level breast-fed more often and for a longer period than did women with less education. Infants exclusively breast-fed had significantly fewer symptoms of disease than did those not breast-fed or partially breast-fed. The odds ratios for cough, respiratory difficulty, and diarrhea by breast-feeding practice were 3.66, 2.14 and 2.72 (P = 0.04). Significant differences in the number of illness episodes were found between breast-fed and bottle-fed infants at 20 weeks; infants exclusively breast-fed had the least number of illness episodes. A positive association was found between number of illness episodes and duration of breast-feeding. Infants who were breast-fed for 20 weeks had the least number of illness episodes; 52% of them had no episode compared with only 15% who were not breast-fed. Comparison of the numbers of illness episodes among non-breast-fed infants of mothers with low and high education levels indicated that the infants of better educated mothers had a significantly lower percentage of illness episodes (P less than 0.05). Even infants of a middle-class and well-educated population benefit from the breast-feeding practice and its protective effect, more so if they are exclusively breast-fed and for a longer period.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6469558

Citation

Palti, H, et al. "Episodes of Illness in Breast-fed and Bottle-fed Infants in Jerusalem." Israel Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 20, no. 5, 1984, pp. 395-9.
Palti H, Mansbach I, Pridan H, et al. Episodes of illness in breast-fed and bottle-fed infants in Jerusalem. Isr J Med Sci. 1984;20(5):395-9.
Palti, H., Mansbach, I., Pridan, H., Adler, B., & Palti, Z. (1984). Episodes of illness in breast-fed and bottle-fed infants in Jerusalem. Israel Journal of Medical Sciences, 20(5), pp. 395-9.
Palti H, et al. Episodes of Illness in Breast-fed and Bottle-fed Infants in Jerusalem. Isr J Med Sci. 1984;20(5):395-9. PubMed PMID: 6469558.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Episodes of illness in breast-fed and bottle-fed infants in Jerusalem. AU - Palti,H, AU - Mansbach,I, AU - Pridan,H, AU - Adler,B, AU - Palti,Z, PY - 1984/5/1/pubmed PY - 1984/5/1/medline PY - 1984/5/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Asia KW - Bottle Feeding--side effects KW - Breast Feeding--beneficial effects KW - Comparative Studies KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Economic Factors KW - Educational Status KW - Health KW - Infant KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Israel KW - Mediterranean Countries KW - Middle Income Population KW - Morbidity KW - Nutrition KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Research Methodology KW - Social Class KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Socioeconomic Status KW - Statistical Studies KW - Studies KW - Western Asia KW - Youth SP - 395 EP - 9 JF - Israel journal of medical sciences JO - Isr. J. Med. Sci. VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - In a prospective study on breast-feeding in Jerusalem, 274 middle-class Jewish women were interviewed about their breast-feeding practices, and symptoms and signs of disease, episodes of illness and hospitalization of the infant. Women of a higher education level breast-fed more often and for a longer period than did women with less education. Infants exclusively breast-fed had significantly fewer symptoms of disease than did those not breast-fed or partially breast-fed. The odds ratios for cough, respiratory difficulty, and diarrhea by breast-feeding practice were 3.66, 2.14 and 2.72 (P = 0.04). Significant differences in the number of illness episodes were found between breast-fed and bottle-fed infants at 20 weeks; infants exclusively breast-fed had the least number of illness episodes. A positive association was found between number of illness episodes and duration of breast-feeding. Infants who were breast-fed for 20 weeks had the least number of illness episodes; 52% of them had no episode compared with only 15% who were not breast-fed. Comparison of the numbers of illness episodes among non-breast-fed infants of mothers with low and high education levels indicated that the infants of better educated mothers had a significantly lower percentage of illness episodes (P less than 0.05). Even infants of a middle-class and well-educated population benefit from the breast-feeding practice and its protective effect, more so if they are exclusively breast-fed and for a longer period. SN - 0021-2180 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6469558/Episodes_of_illness_in_breast_fed_and_bottle_fed_infants_in_Jerusalem_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/breastfeeding.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -