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Determinants of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in blacks and whites: the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Am Heart J 1984; 108(3 Pt 2):641-53AH

Abstract

In 19,521 subjects (8259 and 8561 white males and females; 1299 and 1402 black males and females) in the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II), we assessed black-white differences as major determinants of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to determine whether, and to what degree, higher levels of HDL cholesterol in blacks can be accounted for by black-white differences in nutrient intake, relative ponderosity, alcohol intake, cigarette smoking, leisure-time and habitual physical activity, hypertension, and diabetes. Lower intake of carbohydrate in blacks would be congruent with their higher levels of HDL cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels. In male and female youths and in adult males, there were no substantial black-white differences in Quetelet index; much higher Quetelet indices in black adolescent and adult females compared with whites would be consistent with the narrowing of black-white HDL cholesterol and triglyceride differences in females. There were no substantial differences between blacks and whites in frequency of alcoholic beverage intake, and it seems unlikely that differences in HDL cholesterol levels can be attributed to higher alcohol intake in blacks. Overall, blacks were more likely to have diabetes, were more often hypertensive, and were more often treated with antihypertensive agents; these factors would tend to reduce black-white differences in HDL cholesterol. Heavier smoking rates in whites might augment black-white differences in HDL cholesterol levels. There were no consistent black-white differences in leisure-time activity, although habitual physical activity was at a higher level in blacks. It seems unlikely, overall, that physical activity could account for black-white differences in HDL cholesterol. We speculate that whereas environment has a substantial effect on HDL cholesterol in both blacks and whites, there must be a substantial "genetic" vector accounting for higher levels of HDL cholesterol in blacks.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6475735

Citation

Gartside, P S., et al. "Determinants of High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Blacks and Whites: the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." American Heart Journal, vol. 108, no. 3 Pt 2, 1984, pp. 641-53.
Gartside PS, Khoury P, Glueck CJ. Determinants of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in blacks and whites: the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Am Heart J. 1984;108(3 Pt 2):641-53.
Gartside, P. S., Khoury, P., & Glueck, C. J. (1984). Determinants of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in blacks and whites: the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. American Heart Journal, 108(3 Pt 2), pp. 641-53.
Gartside PS, Khoury P, Glueck CJ. Determinants of High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Blacks and Whites: the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Am Heart J. 1984;108(3 Pt 2):641-53. PubMed PMID: 6475735.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Determinants of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in blacks and whites: the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Gartside,P S, AU - Khoury,P, AU - Glueck,C J, PY - 1984/9/1/pubmed PY - 1984/9/1/medline PY - 1984/9/1/entrez SP - 641 EP - 53 JF - American heart journal JO - Am. Heart J. VL - 108 IS - 3 Pt 2 N2 - In 19,521 subjects (8259 and 8561 white males and females; 1299 and 1402 black males and females) in the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II), we assessed black-white differences as major determinants of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to determine whether, and to what degree, higher levels of HDL cholesterol in blacks can be accounted for by black-white differences in nutrient intake, relative ponderosity, alcohol intake, cigarette smoking, leisure-time and habitual physical activity, hypertension, and diabetes. Lower intake of carbohydrate in blacks would be congruent with their higher levels of HDL cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels. In male and female youths and in adult males, there were no substantial black-white differences in Quetelet index; much higher Quetelet indices in black adolescent and adult females compared with whites would be consistent with the narrowing of black-white HDL cholesterol and triglyceride differences in females. There were no substantial differences between blacks and whites in frequency of alcoholic beverage intake, and it seems unlikely that differences in HDL cholesterol levels can be attributed to higher alcohol intake in blacks. Overall, blacks were more likely to have diabetes, were more often hypertensive, and were more often treated with antihypertensive agents; these factors would tend to reduce black-white differences in HDL cholesterol. Heavier smoking rates in whites might augment black-white differences in HDL cholesterol levels. There were no consistent black-white differences in leisure-time activity, although habitual physical activity was at a higher level in blacks. It seems unlikely, overall, that physical activity could account for black-white differences in HDL cholesterol. We speculate that whereas environment has a substantial effect on HDL cholesterol in both blacks and whites, there must be a substantial "genetic" vector accounting for higher levels of HDL cholesterol in blacks. SN - 0002-8703 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6475735/Determinants_of_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_in_blacks_and_whites:_the_second_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0002-8703(84)90649-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -