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Responses of black and white males to the special intervention program of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial.
Am Heart J 1984; 108(3 Pt 2):839-48AH

Abstract

Of the 12,866 males aged 35 to 57 years who were randomly assigned to the special intervention (SI) and usual care (UC) groups of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT), 931 (7.2%) were black. With use of a multivariate score from the Framingham study, all were assessed to be in the upper 10% to 15% of coronary risk because of their diastolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol level, and/or cigarette use. Blacks in the MRFIT were of lower educational and income levels and were less often employed in professional-technical-managerial or other white-collar jobs than whites. At baseline, blacks had higher mean blood pressures and a higher prevalence of hypertension than whites, were more often smokers but smoked fewer cigarettes per day, and had a higher prevalence of ECG abnormalities. Dietary lipid composition was similar for black and white males; so also were weight and body mass index, plasma total cholesterol levels, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were higher and triglyceride levels lower for blacks than whites. Attendance rates over the years of the trial were similarly high for blacks and whites. Among males in the SI group, smoking cessation rates, changes in dietary lipid composition and in plasma total and LDL cholesterol, and achievement of normotensive diastolic pressure with antihypertensive stepped-care treatment were comparable for black and white males. This MRFIT experience indicates ability to induce extensive changes in life-styles (eating and smoking habits) of both black and white American males of varying educational and socioeconomic backgrounds and also to achieve long-term effective adherence to programs for the treatment and control of hypertension.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6475754

Citation

Connett, J E., and J Stamler. "Responses of Black and White Males to the Special Intervention Program of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial." American Heart Journal, vol. 108, no. 3 Pt 2, 1984, pp. 839-48.
Connett JE, Stamler J. Responses of black and white males to the special intervention program of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Am Heart J. 1984;108(3 Pt 2):839-48.
Connett, J. E., & Stamler, J. (1984). Responses of black and white males to the special intervention program of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. American Heart Journal, 108(3 Pt 2), pp. 839-48.
Connett JE, Stamler J. Responses of Black and White Males to the Special Intervention Program of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Am Heart J. 1984;108(3 Pt 2):839-48. PubMed PMID: 6475754.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Responses of black and white males to the special intervention program of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. AU - Connett,J E, AU - Stamler,J, PY - 1984/9/1/pubmed PY - 1984/9/1/medline PY - 1984/9/1/entrez SP - 839 EP - 48 JF - American heart journal JO - Am. Heart J. VL - 108 IS - 3 Pt 2 N2 - Of the 12,866 males aged 35 to 57 years who were randomly assigned to the special intervention (SI) and usual care (UC) groups of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT), 931 (7.2%) were black. With use of a multivariate score from the Framingham study, all were assessed to be in the upper 10% to 15% of coronary risk because of their diastolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol level, and/or cigarette use. Blacks in the MRFIT were of lower educational and income levels and were less often employed in professional-technical-managerial or other white-collar jobs than whites. At baseline, blacks had higher mean blood pressures and a higher prevalence of hypertension than whites, were more often smokers but smoked fewer cigarettes per day, and had a higher prevalence of ECG abnormalities. Dietary lipid composition was similar for black and white males; so also were weight and body mass index, plasma total cholesterol levels, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were higher and triglyceride levels lower for blacks than whites. Attendance rates over the years of the trial were similarly high for blacks and whites. Among males in the SI group, smoking cessation rates, changes in dietary lipid composition and in plasma total and LDL cholesterol, and achievement of normotensive diastolic pressure with antihypertensive stepped-care treatment were comparable for black and white males. This MRFIT experience indicates ability to induce extensive changes in life-styles (eating and smoking habits) of both black and white American males of varying educational and socioeconomic backgrounds and also to achieve long-term effective adherence to programs for the treatment and control of hypertension. SN - 0002-8703 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6475754/Responses_of_black_and_white_males_to_the_special_intervention_program_of_the_Multiple_Risk_Factor_Intervention_Trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0002-8703(84)90680-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -