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Diet, nutrition intake, and metabolism in populations at high and low risk for colon cancer. Dietary cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, and stigmasterol.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1984 10; 40(4 Suppl):927-30.AJ

Abstract

Cholesterol and fat are implicated as dietary factors enhancing the risk for colon carcinogenesis. Plant sterols such as beta-sitosterol when added to diets of experimental animals treated with colon carcinogens reduce tumor yields and counteract the proliferative changes associated with carcinogenesis. The question of whether the diet of human populations at low risk for colon cancer is mirrored in their sterol composition is addressed in this study. Four study groups consisting of 18 Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) pure vegetarians, 50 SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians, 50 SDA nonvegetarians, and 50 general population nonvegetarians were selected from the greater Los Angeles basin, and 3-day composite diets were analyzed for their sterol composition. The most significant index of dietary sterol status is the ratio, beta-sitosterol + stigmasterol/cholesterol (plant sterol/cholesterol ratio). The values for the four groups ranged from 0.49 to 16.0 (general population nonvegetarians = 0.49; SDA-nonvegetarians = 0.98; SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians = 3.26; SDA pure vegetarians = 16.0). The data also show that the absolute amounts of cholesterol consumed as a factor by itself might not be as significant as its relationship to total plant sterols in the diet.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6486101

Citation

Nair, P P., et al. "Diet, Nutrition Intake, and Metabolism in Populations at High and Low Risk for Colon Cancer. Dietary Cholesterol, Beta-sitosterol, and Stigmasterol." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 40, no. 4 Suppl, 1984, pp. 927-30.
Nair PP, Turjman N, Kessie G, et al. Diet, nutrition intake, and metabolism in populations at high and low risk for colon cancer. Dietary cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, and stigmasterol. Am J Clin Nutr. 1984;40(4 Suppl):927-30.
Nair, P. P., Turjman, N., Kessie, G., Calkins, B., Goodman, G. T., Davidovitz, H., & Nimmagadda, G. (1984). Diet, nutrition intake, and metabolism in populations at high and low risk for colon cancer. Dietary cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, and stigmasterol. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 40(4 Suppl), 927-30. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/40.4.927
Nair PP, et al. Diet, Nutrition Intake, and Metabolism in Populations at High and Low Risk for Colon Cancer. Dietary Cholesterol, Beta-sitosterol, and Stigmasterol. Am J Clin Nutr. 1984;40(4 Suppl):927-30. PubMed PMID: 6486101.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet, nutrition intake, and metabolism in populations at high and low risk for colon cancer. Dietary cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, and stigmasterol. AU - Nair,P P, AU - Turjman,N, AU - Kessie,G, AU - Calkins,B, AU - Goodman,G T, AU - Davidovitz,H, AU - Nimmagadda,G, PY - 1984/10/1/pubmed PY - 1984/10/1/medline PY - 1984/10/1/entrez SP - 927 EP - 30 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 40 IS - 4 Suppl N2 - Cholesterol and fat are implicated as dietary factors enhancing the risk for colon carcinogenesis. Plant sterols such as beta-sitosterol when added to diets of experimental animals treated with colon carcinogens reduce tumor yields and counteract the proliferative changes associated with carcinogenesis. The question of whether the diet of human populations at low risk for colon cancer is mirrored in their sterol composition is addressed in this study. Four study groups consisting of 18 Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) pure vegetarians, 50 SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians, 50 SDA nonvegetarians, and 50 general population nonvegetarians were selected from the greater Los Angeles basin, and 3-day composite diets were analyzed for their sterol composition. The most significant index of dietary sterol status is the ratio, beta-sitosterol + stigmasterol/cholesterol (plant sterol/cholesterol ratio). The values for the four groups ranged from 0.49 to 16.0 (general population nonvegetarians = 0.49; SDA-nonvegetarians = 0.98; SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians = 3.26; SDA pure vegetarians = 16.0). The data also show that the absolute amounts of cholesterol consumed as a factor by itself might not be as significant as its relationship to total plant sterols in the diet. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6486101/Diet_nutrition_intake_and_metabolism_in_populations_at_high_and_low_risk_for_colon_cancer__Dietary_cholesterol_beta_sitosterol_and_stigmasterol_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/40.4.927 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -