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Dietary omega-3 fatty acids prevent carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia.
Metabolism 1984; 33(11):1016-9M

Abstract

Dietary fish oils rich in omega-3 fatty acids are remarkably hypotriglyceridemic in both normal and hypertriglyceridemic subjects. This present study was designed to examine the hypothesis that dietary fish oils could prevent the usual sharp increase in plasma triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels that occur physiologically after the induction by a high-carbohydrate diet. Seven healthy volunteers consumed three experimental liquid formula diets: the baseline diet (45% fat, 10% protein, 45% carbohydrate) and two high-carbohydrate diets (15% fat, 10% protein, 75% carbohydrate), one as a control diet and the other containing fish oil. The baseline and control dietary fats were a mixture of peanut oil and cocoa butter, whereas the fish oil diet contained high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. The plasma triglyceride levels rose from 105 mg/dL during baseline diet to 194 mg/dL during the high-CHO control diet (P less than 0.005). VLDL triglyceride levels increased from 69 to 156 mg/dL (P less than 0.005) and VLDL cholesterol from 18 to 34 mg/dL (P less than 0.005). When fish oil was substituted for the control fats, plasma triglyceride levels fell from 194 to 75 mg/dL (P less than 0.005), VLDL triglyceride and cholesterol levels were reduced from 156 to 34 mg/dL (P less than 0.005) and from 34 to 12 mg/dL (P less than 0.005), respectively. These effects were noted by two to three days after beginning the fish oil diet. Thus, dietary omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil rapidly and markedly reduced VLDL triglyceride levels even in the face of a high-carbohydrate diet.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6493044

Citation

Harris, W S., et al. "Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Prevent Carbohydrate-induced Hypertriglyceridemia." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 33, no. 11, 1984, pp. 1016-9.
Harris WS, Connor WE, Inkeles SB, et al. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids prevent carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia. Metab Clin Exp. 1984;33(11):1016-9.
Harris, W. S., Connor, W. E., Inkeles, S. B., & Illingworth, D. R. (1984). Dietary omega-3 fatty acids prevent carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 33(11), pp. 1016-9.
Harris WS, et al. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Prevent Carbohydrate-induced Hypertriglyceridemia. Metab Clin Exp. 1984;33(11):1016-9. PubMed PMID: 6493044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary omega-3 fatty acids prevent carbohydrate-induced hypertriglyceridemia. AU - Harris,W S, AU - Connor,W E, AU - Inkeles,S B, AU - Illingworth,D R, PY - 1984/11/1/pubmed PY - 1984/11/1/medline PY - 1984/11/1/entrez SP - 1016 EP - 9 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metab. Clin. Exp. VL - 33 IS - 11 N2 - Dietary fish oils rich in omega-3 fatty acids are remarkably hypotriglyceridemic in both normal and hypertriglyceridemic subjects. This present study was designed to examine the hypothesis that dietary fish oils could prevent the usual sharp increase in plasma triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels that occur physiologically after the induction by a high-carbohydrate diet. Seven healthy volunteers consumed three experimental liquid formula diets: the baseline diet (45% fat, 10% protein, 45% carbohydrate) and two high-carbohydrate diets (15% fat, 10% protein, 75% carbohydrate), one as a control diet and the other containing fish oil. The baseline and control dietary fats were a mixture of peanut oil and cocoa butter, whereas the fish oil diet contained high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. The plasma triglyceride levels rose from 105 mg/dL during baseline diet to 194 mg/dL during the high-CHO control diet (P less than 0.005). VLDL triglyceride levels increased from 69 to 156 mg/dL (P less than 0.005) and VLDL cholesterol from 18 to 34 mg/dL (P less than 0.005). When fish oil was substituted for the control fats, plasma triglyceride levels fell from 194 to 75 mg/dL (P less than 0.005), VLDL triglyceride and cholesterol levels were reduced from 156 to 34 mg/dL (P less than 0.005) and from 34 to 12 mg/dL (P less than 0.005), respectively. These effects were noted by two to three days after beginning the fish oil diet. Thus, dietary omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil rapidly and markedly reduced VLDL triglyceride levels even in the face of a high-carbohydrate diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0026-0495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6493044/Dietary_omega_3_fatty_acids_prevent_carbohydrate_induced_hypertriglyceridemia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0026-0495(84)90230-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -