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A combined study of the strain gauge plethysmography and I-125 fibrinogen leg scan in the differentiation of deep vein thrombosis and postphlebitic syndrome.
Am Surg. 1984 Nov; 50(11):585-8.AS

Abstract

The fallibility of the clinical diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and postphlebitic syndrome has led to a variety of noninvasive diagnostic modalities, e.g, Doppler ultrasound, plethysmography, and radionuclide phlebography. The purpose of this study is to analyze the value of combined strain gauge plethysmography (SPG) and I-125 fibrinogen leg scanning in the differentiation of DVT and postphlebitic syndrome. Using strain gauge plethysmograph, 600 studies were performed on 502 patients. The maximum venous outflow (MVO) was calculated. An MVO of 20 cm3/100 cm3 of tissue/min or above was considered normal, and MVO of less than 20 cm3 was abnormal. Of those, 150 limbs had I-125 fibrinogen leg scan and venograms. Of 82 normal SPG, when compared with venograms, 75 were normal, five had postphlebitic syndrome, and two had DVT (97.6% true-negative). Sixty-eight legs had positive SPG, 46 of which had DVT (67.6% true-positive), 21 had postphlebitic syndrome (30.9%), and one was normal (1.5% false-positive). When rubber tourniquets were placed lightly on each leg between the strain gauge and the thigh cuff, 12 legs changed from positive SPG to negative SPG; 56 legs only had positive SPG. Forty-six of these had DVT (82.1% true-positive), nine had postphlebitic syndrome, and one was normal. When positive SPG was combined with positive leg scan, the accuracy raised to 95.6% (44 of 46 legs). If the SPG was positive but the leg scan was negative, the possibility of postphlebitic syndrome was most likely (8 of 10, i.e., 80%).

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6497179

Citation

AbuRahma, A F., and L Osborne. "A Combined Study of the Strain Gauge Plethysmography and I-125 Fibrinogen Leg Scan in the Differentiation of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Postphlebitic Syndrome." The American Surgeon, vol. 50, no. 11, 1984, pp. 585-8.
AbuRahma AF, Osborne L. A combined study of the strain gauge plethysmography and I-125 fibrinogen leg scan in the differentiation of deep vein thrombosis and postphlebitic syndrome. Am Surg. 1984;50(11):585-8.
AbuRahma, A. F., & Osborne, L. (1984). A combined study of the strain gauge plethysmography and I-125 fibrinogen leg scan in the differentiation of deep vein thrombosis and postphlebitic syndrome. The American Surgeon, 50(11), 585-8.
AbuRahma AF, Osborne L. A Combined Study of the Strain Gauge Plethysmography and I-125 Fibrinogen Leg Scan in the Differentiation of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Postphlebitic Syndrome. Am Surg. 1984;50(11):585-8. PubMed PMID: 6497179.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A combined study of the strain gauge plethysmography and I-125 fibrinogen leg scan in the differentiation of deep vein thrombosis and postphlebitic syndrome. AU - AbuRahma,A F, AU - Osborne,L, PY - 1984/11/1/pubmed PY - 1984/11/1/medline PY - 1984/11/1/entrez SP - 585 EP - 8 JF - The American surgeon JO - Am Surg VL - 50 IS - 11 N2 - The fallibility of the clinical diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and postphlebitic syndrome has led to a variety of noninvasive diagnostic modalities, e.g, Doppler ultrasound, plethysmography, and radionuclide phlebography. The purpose of this study is to analyze the value of combined strain gauge plethysmography (SPG) and I-125 fibrinogen leg scanning in the differentiation of DVT and postphlebitic syndrome. Using strain gauge plethysmograph, 600 studies were performed on 502 patients. The maximum venous outflow (MVO) was calculated. An MVO of 20 cm3/100 cm3 of tissue/min or above was considered normal, and MVO of less than 20 cm3 was abnormal. Of those, 150 limbs had I-125 fibrinogen leg scan and venograms. Of 82 normal SPG, when compared with venograms, 75 were normal, five had postphlebitic syndrome, and two had DVT (97.6% true-negative). Sixty-eight legs had positive SPG, 46 of which had DVT (67.6% true-positive), 21 had postphlebitic syndrome (30.9%), and one was normal (1.5% false-positive). When rubber tourniquets were placed lightly on each leg between the strain gauge and the thigh cuff, 12 legs changed from positive SPG to negative SPG; 56 legs only had positive SPG. Forty-six of these had DVT (82.1% true-positive), nine had postphlebitic syndrome, and one was normal. When positive SPG was combined with positive leg scan, the accuracy raised to 95.6% (44 of 46 legs). If the SPG was positive but the leg scan was negative, the possibility of postphlebitic syndrome was most likely (8 of 10, i.e., 80%). SN - 0003-1348 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6497179/A_combined_study_of_the_strain_gauge_plethysmography_and_I_125_fibrinogen_leg_scan_in_the_differentiation_of_deep_vein_thrombosis_and_postphlebitic_syndrome_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/7087 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -