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The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study.
Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 1984 Dec; 11(3):743-57.CO

Abstract

The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study involves over 17 000 women who were recruited at 17 clinics in England and Scotland during the interval 1968-74 and have been followed up ever since. This paper describes the survey methods, the characteristics of the participants, the progress of the study, the main results and publications to date, and the proposals for future work. Although the study was originally mainly concerned with the benefits and risks of oral contraceptives it has, in fact, contributed to knowledge about a wide variety of birth control methods. The data on efficacy are of special value in that they cover all methods of contraception in common use and have been derived from a homogeneous and closely observed population. The mortality figures, while limited in extent, have supplemented the findings in the Royal College of General Practitioners study. Reports on morbidity from many different diseases have been published; these have documented both beneficial and harmful effects of various contraceptive methods. The study data on return of fertility after discontinuation of contraception are unique, while contributions have also been made to knowledge about outcome of pregnancy in those stopping contraception to have a planned baby or becoming accidentally pregnant while using a birth control method. The study, which is supported by the Medical Research Council, is currently funded until mid-1989.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6509857

Citation

Vessey, M P., and M Lawless. "The Oxford-Family Planning Association Contraceptive Study." Clinics in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 11, no. 3, 1984, pp. 743-57.
Vessey MP, Lawless M. The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study. Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 1984;11(3):743-57.
Vessey, M. P., & Lawless, M. (1984). The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study. Clinics in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 11(3), 743-57.
Vessey MP, Lawless M. The Oxford-Family Planning Association Contraceptive Study. Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 1984;11(3):743-57. PubMed PMID: 6509857.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study. AU - Vessey,M P, AU - Lawless,M, PY - 1984/12/1/pubmed PY - 1984/12/1/medline PY - 1984/12/1/entrez KW - Barrier Methods KW - Contraception--changes KW - Contraceptive Agents KW - Contraceptive Agents, Female KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Europe KW - Family Planning KW - Iud KW - Longitudinal Studies KW - Longterm Effects KW - Northern Europe KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Research Methodology KW - Studies KW - Time Factors KW - United Kingdom KW - Vaginal Barrier Methods KW - Vaginal Diaphragm SP - 743 EP - 57 JF - Clinics in obstetrics and gynaecology JO - Clin Obstet Gynaecol VL - 11 IS - 3 N2 - The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study involves over 17 000 women who were recruited at 17 clinics in England and Scotland during the interval 1968-74 and have been followed up ever since. This paper describes the survey methods, the characteristics of the participants, the progress of the study, the main results and publications to date, and the proposals for future work. Although the study was originally mainly concerned with the benefits and risks of oral contraceptives it has, in fact, contributed to knowledge about a wide variety of birth control methods. The data on efficacy are of special value in that they cover all methods of contraception in common use and have been derived from a homogeneous and closely observed population. The mortality figures, while limited in extent, have supplemented the findings in the Royal College of General Practitioners study. Reports on morbidity from many different diseases have been published; these have documented both beneficial and harmful effects of various contraceptive methods. The study data on return of fertility after discontinuation of contraception are unique, while contributions have also been made to knowledge about outcome of pregnancy in those stopping contraception to have a planned baby or becoming accidentally pregnant while using a birth control method. The study, which is supported by the Medical Research Council, is currently funded until mid-1989. SN - 0306-3356 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6509857/The_Oxford_Family_Planning_Association_contraceptive_study_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/birthcontrol.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -