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[Plasma oxalate concentration in calcium oxalate stone formers].
Hinyokika Kiyo. 1984 Oct; 30(10):1405-15.HK

Abstract

A sensitive, simplified method for plasma oxalate determination by gas chromatography is described. After deproteinizing the plasma with 3N HC1 and 20% sulfosalicylic acid, the oxalate was methylated, extracted and analysed by gas chromatography. This method has three advantages i.e., smaller sample size (plasma 5.0 ml), rapidity (takes less than 3 hours) and accuracy. The recovery rate of oxalate added to plasma was 91.42 +/- 11.31% (SD) and the coefficient of variation of replicate determinations was 4.18%. The minimum detectable concentration of oxalate was 0.3 micrograms/ml (oxalate peak was higher than 5 mm). The mean oxalate concentration under fasting conditions from 16 healthy subjects was 1.37 +/- 0.39 micrograms/ml (SD), while that from 31 calcium oxalate stone formers was 1.45 +/- 0.39 micrograms/ml (SD). There was no significant difference in plasma oxalate concentration between the two groups. The dietary influence of oxalate on plasma and urinary oxalate was investigated in 5 healthy subjects and 5 calcium oxalate stone formers. When 100 g spinach (total oxalate 545.5 mg, soluble oxalate 381.5 mg) was given, the increase of plasma oxalate concentration was more prominent in stone formers; in stone formers it increased to 142% of control value at 2 hours (p less than 0.05) after spinach loading, to 163% at 4 hour (p less than 0.01) and to 232% at 6 hours (p less than 0.01); while in healthy subjects increased to 119% at 2 hours (ns) after loading, to 144% at 4 hours (p less than 0.05) and only to 167% at 6 hours (p less than 0.01). Urinary oxalate excretion increased promptly between 1 and 2 hours after loading in both groups, reaching peak levels between 2 and 4 hours after loading in healthy subjects and between 4 and 6 hours or later in stone formers. The mean renal clearance of oxalate was 18.0 ml/min in 6 healthy subjects and 19.0 ml/min in 4 calcium oxalate stone formers. There was no significant difference in oxalate clearance between the two groups. The mean ratio of oxalate/creatinine clearance was 0.22 for stone formers, which was equal to that for healthy subjects.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

6524552

Citation

Hoshina, A. "[Plasma Oxalate Concentration in Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers]." Hinyokika Kiyo. Acta Urologica Japonica, vol. 30, no. 10, 1984, pp. 1405-15.
Hoshina A. [Plasma oxalate concentration in calcium oxalate stone formers]. Hinyokika Kiyo. 1984;30(10):1405-15.
Hoshina, A. (1984). [Plasma oxalate concentration in calcium oxalate stone formers]. Hinyokika Kiyo. Acta Urologica Japonica, 30(10), 1405-15.
Hoshina A. [Plasma Oxalate Concentration in Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers]. Hinyokika Kiyo. 1984;30(10):1405-15. PubMed PMID: 6524552.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Plasma oxalate concentration in calcium oxalate stone formers]. A1 - Hoshina,A, PY - 1984/10/1/pubmed PY - 1984/10/1/medline PY - 1984/10/1/entrez SP - 1405 EP - 15 JF - Hinyokika kiyo. Acta urologica Japonica JO - Hinyokika Kiyo VL - 30 IS - 10 N2 - A sensitive, simplified method for plasma oxalate determination by gas chromatography is described. After deproteinizing the plasma with 3N HC1 and 20% sulfosalicylic acid, the oxalate was methylated, extracted and analysed by gas chromatography. This method has three advantages i.e., smaller sample size (plasma 5.0 ml), rapidity (takes less than 3 hours) and accuracy. The recovery rate of oxalate added to plasma was 91.42 +/- 11.31% (SD) and the coefficient of variation of replicate determinations was 4.18%. The minimum detectable concentration of oxalate was 0.3 micrograms/ml (oxalate peak was higher than 5 mm). The mean oxalate concentration under fasting conditions from 16 healthy subjects was 1.37 +/- 0.39 micrograms/ml (SD), while that from 31 calcium oxalate stone formers was 1.45 +/- 0.39 micrograms/ml (SD). There was no significant difference in plasma oxalate concentration between the two groups. The dietary influence of oxalate on plasma and urinary oxalate was investigated in 5 healthy subjects and 5 calcium oxalate stone formers. When 100 g spinach (total oxalate 545.5 mg, soluble oxalate 381.5 mg) was given, the increase of plasma oxalate concentration was more prominent in stone formers; in stone formers it increased to 142% of control value at 2 hours (p less than 0.05) after spinach loading, to 163% at 4 hour (p less than 0.01) and to 232% at 6 hours (p less than 0.01); while in healthy subjects increased to 119% at 2 hours (ns) after loading, to 144% at 4 hours (p less than 0.05) and only to 167% at 6 hours (p less than 0.01). Urinary oxalate excretion increased promptly between 1 and 2 hours after loading in both groups, reaching peak levels between 2 and 4 hours after loading in healthy subjects and between 4 and 6 hours or later in stone formers. The mean renal clearance of oxalate was 18.0 ml/min in 6 healthy subjects and 19.0 ml/min in 4 calcium oxalate stone formers. There was no significant difference in oxalate clearance between the two groups. The mean ratio of oxalate/creatinine clearance was 0.22 for stone formers, which was equal to that for healthy subjects. SN - 0018-1994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6524552/[Plasma_oxalate_concentration_in_calcium_oxalate_stone_formers]_ L2 - https://repository.kulib.kyoto-u.ac.jp/dspace/handle/2433/118306 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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