Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Endoscopic sclerosing therapy of esophageal varices: present status].
Z Gastroenterol. 1983 Apr; 21(4):151-8.ZG

Abstract

Endoscopic sclerotherapy of esophageal varices has been widely introduced in the treatment of portal hypertension. Two methods are applied: intravariceal injection obliterating portosystemic collaterals and paravariceal injection inducing subepithelial fibrosis. 90% of acute variceal bleedings are effectively controlled by both methods. In this respect, sclerotherapy may be superior to balloon tamponade. 10-20% of patients experience one of the following complications: esophageal ulcers and/or stenosis, pleural effusions, perforations and mediastinitis. The risk of recurrent variceal hemorrhage varies between 10 and 60 X 10(-3) per patient month depending on differences in patient characteristics and on the injection method used. Prophylaxis of recurrent variceal bleeding represents the only indication sufficiently supported by controlled trials. The reduced recurrence risk seems to correlate with a concomitant increase in long term survival. Encouraging data have been reported concerning the application of endoscopic sclerotherapy in acute variceal hemorrhage and as a prophylactic procedure in selected patients before the advent of first variceal bleeding. Furthermore, endoscopic sclerotherapy awaits controlled prospective comparison with elective portosystemic shunt surgery and medical treatment using beta-blocking agents.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

6603075

Citation

Fleig, W E.. "[Endoscopic Sclerosing Therapy of Esophageal Varices: Present Status]." Zeitschrift Fur Gastroenterologie, vol. 21, no. 4, 1983, pp. 151-8.
Fleig WE. [Endoscopic sclerosing therapy of esophageal varices: present status]. Z Gastroenterol. 1983;21(4):151-8.
Fleig, W. E. (1983). [Endoscopic sclerosing therapy of esophageal varices: present status]. Zeitschrift Fur Gastroenterologie, 21(4), 151-8.
Fleig WE. [Endoscopic Sclerosing Therapy of Esophageal Varices: Present Status]. Z Gastroenterol. 1983;21(4):151-8. PubMed PMID: 6603075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Endoscopic sclerosing therapy of esophageal varices: present status]. A1 - Fleig,W E, PY - 1983/4/1/pubmed PY - 1983/4/1/medline PY - 1983/4/1/entrez SP - 151 EP - 8 JF - Zeitschrift fur Gastroenterologie JO - Z Gastroenterol VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - Endoscopic sclerotherapy of esophageal varices has been widely introduced in the treatment of portal hypertension. Two methods are applied: intravariceal injection obliterating portosystemic collaterals and paravariceal injection inducing subepithelial fibrosis. 90% of acute variceal bleedings are effectively controlled by both methods. In this respect, sclerotherapy may be superior to balloon tamponade. 10-20% of patients experience one of the following complications: esophageal ulcers and/or stenosis, pleural effusions, perforations and mediastinitis. The risk of recurrent variceal hemorrhage varies between 10 and 60 X 10(-3) per patient month depending on differences in patient characteristics and on the injection method used. Prophylaxis of recurrent variceal bleeding represents the only indication sufficiently supported by controlled trials. The reduced recurrence risk seems to correlate with a concomitant increase in long term survival. Encouraging data have been reported concerning the application of endoscopic sclerotherapy in acute variceal hemorrhage and as a prophylactic procedure in selected patients before the advent of first variceal bleeding. Furthermore, endoscopic sclerotherapy awaits controlled prospective comparison with elective portosystemic shunt surgery and medical treatment using beta-blocking agents. SN - 0044-2771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6603075/[Endoscopic_sclerosing_therapy_of_esophageal_varices:_present_status]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2658 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -