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Determinants and prognosis of laryngeal cancer.
Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 1984 Feb; 17(1):139-50.OC

Abstract

The evidence demonstrating the strong effects of tobacco and alcohol on laryngeal cancer risk is consistent and compelling. Furthermore, investigations indicate that joint exposures to tobacco and alcohol interact to elevate laryngeal cancer risk above what would be expected if these risk factors had merely additive effects. Occupational findings indicate that a few occupational groups may be facing a greater risk of laryngeal cancer from occupational exposures; this increased risk is not entirely due to alcohol drinking and smoking habits. All patients with laryngeal cancer are at higher risk of developing a second primary tumor; therefore, their treatment and follow-up should be judicious.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6718015

Citation

Cann, C I., and M P. Fried. "Determinants and Prognosis of Laryngeal Cancer." Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, vol. 17, no. 1, 1984, pp. 139-50.
Cann CI, Fried MP. Determinants and prognosis of laryngeal cancer. Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 1984;17(1):139-50.
Cann, C. I., & Fried, M. P. (1984). Determinants and prognosis of laryngeal cancer. Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, 17(1), 139-50.
Cann CI, Fried MP. Determinants and Prognosis of Laryngeal Cancer. Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 1984;17(1):139-50. PubMed PMID: 6718015.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Determinants and prognosis of laryngeal cancer. AU - Cann,C I, AU - Fried,M P, PY - 1984/2/1/pubmed PY - 1984/2/1/medline PY - 1984/2/1/entrez SP - 139 EP - 50 JF - Otolaryngologic clinics of North America JO - Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am. VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - The evidence demonstrating the strong effects of tobacco and alcohol on laryngeal cancer risk is consistent and compelling. Furthermore, investigations indicate that joint exposures to tobacco and alcohol interact to elevate laryngeal cancer risk above what would be expected if these risk factors had merely additive effects. Occupational findings indicate that a few occupational groups may be facing a greater risk of laryngeal cancer from occupational exposures; this increased risk is not entirely due to alcohol drinking and smoking habits. All patients with laryngeal cancer are at higher risk of developing a second primary tumor; therefore, their treatment and follow-up should be judicious. SN - 0030-6665 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6718015/Determinants_and_prognosis_of_laryngeal_cancer_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4098 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -