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Comparative nutrition and health services for victims of drought and hostilities in the Ogaden: Somalia and Ethiopia, 1980-1981.
Int J Health Serv 1983; 13(2):289-306IJ

Abstract

The civil chaos created by a combination of drought and hostilities in the Ogaden region of southern Ethiopia during the past five years has caused the majority of the indigenous, principally nomadic population to flee the area and seek refuge either in Somali refugee camps or in Ethiopian shelters for displaced persons. This paper compares the provision of basic food rations, selective feeding programs, primary health care, and preventive health measures between the two groups. During 1980-1981 Somalia received more international assistance per capita than Ethiopia. Large numbers of Western personnel provided health and nutrition services in Somali refugee camps, whereas no foreigners were involved in Ethiopian shelters. These disparities were largely due to inadequate publicity concerning the problems Ethiopia faces, partly resulting from real and perceived political limitations related to the Soviet presence in that country. Refugee needs in Somalia have been publicized far more adequately, partly due to that country's alignment with the West. The Ethiopians nevertheless demonstrated greater efficiency in assisting their disaster victims; camp services comparable to those in Somalia were available despite greater logistic difficulties and fewer donated resources. The effectiveness of relief operations in Somalia was reduced by political constraints on governmental agencies.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6853004

Citation

Henderson, P L., and R J. Biellik. "Comparative Nutrition and Health Services for Victims of Drought and Hostilities in the Ogaden: Somalia and Ethiopia, 1980-1981." International Journal of Health Services : Planning, Administration, Evaluation, vol. 13, no. 2, 1983, pp. 289-306.
Henderson PL, Biellik RJ. Comparative nutrition and health services for victims of drought and hostilities in the Ogaden: Somalia and Ethiopia, 1980-1981. Int J Health Serv. 1983;13(2):289-306.
Henderson, P. L., & Biellik, R. J. (1983). Comparative nutrition and health services for victims of drought and hostilities in the Ogaden: Somalia and Ethiopia, 1980-1981. International Journal of Health Services : Planning, Administration, Evaluation, 13(2), pp. 289-306.
Henderson PL, Biellik RJ. Comparative Nutrition and Health Services for Victims of Drought and Hostilities in the Ogaden: Somalia and Ethiopia, 1980-1981. Int J Health Serv. 1983;13(2):289-306. PubMed PMID: 6853004.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparative nutrition and health services for victims of drought and hostilities in the Ogaden: Somalia and Ethiopia, 1980-1981. AU - Henderson,P L, AU - Biellik,R J, PY - 1983/1/1/pubmed PY - 1983/1/1/medline PY - 1983/1/1/entrez SP - 289 EP - 306 JF - International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation JO - Int J Health Serv VL - 13 IS - 2 N2 - The civil chaos created by a combination of drought and hostilities in the Ogaden region of southern Ethiopia during the past five years has caused the majority of the indigenous, principally nomadic population to flee the area and seek refuge either in Somali refugee camps or in Ethiopian shelters for displaced persons. This paper compares the provision of basic food rations, selective feeding programs, primary health care, and preventive health measures between the two groups. During 1980-1981 Somalia received more international assistance per capita than Ethiopia. Large numbers of Western personnel provided health and nutrition services in Somali refugee camps, whereas no foreigners were involved in Ethiopian shelters. These disparities were largely due to inadequate publicity concerning the problems Ethiopia faces, partly resulting from real and perceived political limitations related to the Soviet presence in that country. Refugee needs in Somalia have been publicized far more adequately, partly due to that country's alignment with the West. The Ethiopians nevertheless demonstrated greater efficiency in assisting their disaster victims; camp services comparable to those in Somalia were available despite greater logistic difficulties and fewer donated resources. The effectiveness of relief operations in Somalia was reduced by political constraints on governmental agencies. SN - 0020-7314 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6853004/Comparative_nutrition_and_health_services_for_victims_of_drought_and_hostilities_in_the_Ogaden:_Somalia_and_Ethiopia_1980_1981_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.2190/QGL7-V3U2-39D6-TELY?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -