Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Altitude illness. The dangers of the heights and how to avoid them.
Postgrad Med. 1983 Jul; 74(1):231-48.PM

Abstract

Altitude illness, caused by lack of oxygen, manifests itself in several forms, including acute mountain sickness, high-altitude pulmonary edema, and high-altitude cerebral edema. The first of these is usually minor, but the second and third can be fatal unless promptly diagnosed and treated (descent being the most effective management). Other, more specific, problems such as high-altitude retinal hemorrhage and thrombophlebitis can also occur in some individuals. Even so, there are only a few medical reasons to deprive an ambulatory, well-compensated patient of a visit to moderate altitude, and the conscientious physician will weigh carefully the risks against the benefits of a vacation in a beautiful and inspiring mountain setting.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6866864

Citation

Houston, C S.. "Altitude Illness. the Dangers of the Heights and How to Avoid Them." Postgraduate Medicine, vol. 74, no. 1, 1983, pp. 231-48.
Houston CS. Altitude illness. The dangers of the heights and how to avoid them. Postgrad Med. 1983;74(1):231-48.
Houston, C. S. (1983). Altitude illness. The dangers of the heights and how to avoid them. Postgraduate Medicine, 74(1), 231-48.
Houston CS. Altitude Illness. the Dangers of the Heights and How to Avoid Them. Postgrad Med. 1983;74(1):231-48. PubMed PMID: 6866864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Altitude illness. The dangers of the heights and how to avoid them. A1 - Houston,C S, PY - 1983/7/1/pubmed PY - 1983/7/1/medline PY - 1983/7/1/entrez SP - 231 EP - 48 JF - Postgraduate medicine JO - Postgrad Med VL - 74 IS - 1 N2 - Altitude illness, caused by lack of oxygen, manifests itself in several forms, including acute mountain sickness, high-altitude pulmonary edema, and high-altitude cerebral edema. The first of these is usually minor, but the second and third can be fatal unless promptly diagnosed and treated (descent being the most effective management). Other, more specific, problems such as high-altitude retinal hemorrhage and thrombophlebitis can also occur in some individuals. Even so, there are only a few medical reasons to deprive an ambulatory, well-compensated patient of a visit to moderate altitude, and the conscientious physician will weigh carefully the risks against the benefits of a vacation in a beautiful and inspiring mountain setting. SN - 0032-5481 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6866864/Altitude_illness__The_dangers_of_the_heights_and_how_to_avoid_them_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00325481.1983.11697917 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -