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Sensory conflict theory of space motion sickness: an anatomical location for the neuroconflict.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1983 May; 54(5):464-5.AS

Abstract

Most investigators understand sensory conflict to mean a discontinuity between either visual, proprioceptive, and somatosensory input, or semicircular canal and otolith input. Few hypotheses have attempted to define specific physiological mechanisms linking the conflict with the sickness. Suggestions that the theory be renamed the neural mismatch theory allow for the possibility that central integrative mechanisms are involved in interpreting the significance of the sensory environment and that the conflict between visual or vestibular input systems or between separate components of the vestibular system is of secondary importance to mismatch occurring between ongoing sensory experience and long-term memory. This paper describes the role of the limbic system in integration of sensory information and long-term memory, in the expression of the symptoms of motion sickness, and the impact of anti-motion sickness drugs and stress hormones on limbic system function. The limbic system may be the neural mismatch center of the brain.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6870740

Citation

Kohl, R L.. "Sensory Conflict Theory of Space Motion Sickness: an Anatomical Location for the Neuroconflict." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 54, no. 5, 1983, pp. 464-5.
Kohl RL. Sensory conflict theory of space motion sickness: an anatomical location for the neuroconflict. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1983;54(5):464-5.
Kohl, R. L. (1983). Sensory conflict theory of space motion sickness: an anatomical location for the neuroconflict. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 54(5), 464-5.
Kohl RL. Sensory Conflict Theory of Space Motion Sickness: an Anatomical Location for the Neuroconflict. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1983;54(5):464-5. PubMed PMID: 6870740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sensory conflict theory of space motion sickness: an anatomical location for the neuroconflict. A1 - Kohl,R L, PY - 1983/5/1/pubmed PY - 1983/5/1/medline PY - 1983/5/1/entrez SP - 464 EP - 5 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 54 IS - 5 N2 - Most investigators understand sensory conflict to mean a discontinuity between either visual, proprioceptive, and somatosensory input, or semicircular canal and otolith input. Few hypotheses have attempted to define specific physiological mechanisms linking the conflict with the sickness. Suggestions that the theory be renamed the neural mismatch theory allow for the possibility that central integrative mechanisms are involved in interpreting the significance of the sensory environment and that the conflict between visual or vestibular input systems or between separate components of the vestibular system is of secondary importance to mismatch occurring between ongoing sensory experience and long-term memory. This paper describes the role of the limbic system in integration of sensory information and long-term memory, in the expression of the symptoms of motion sickness, and the impact of anti-motion sickness drugs and stress hormones on limbic system function. The limbic system may be the neural mismatch center of the brain. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6870740/Sensory_conflict_theory_of_space_motion_sickness:_an_anatomical_location_for_the_neuroconflict_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/motionsickness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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