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Aluminium-induced, reversible microcytic anemia in chronic renal failure: clinical and experimental studies.
Clin Nephrol 1983; 19(6):295-8CN

Abstract

Ten chronic hemodialysis patients with severe aluminium (Al) intoxication developed a microcytic anemia despite oral iron supplementation. Their microcytosis was reversible after deionization of the dialysis water. Ten age and sex matched hemodialysis patients who were not Al intoxicated but who had a comparable treatment schedule and time on dialysis had no such microcytosis. In order to investigate a possible direct role of Al we intoxicated uremic rats by daily (6/7 days a week) intraperitoneal injections of 30 nmoles/day of aluminium. After 3 months, the Al-intoxicated uremic rats had a significantly lower hematocrit (34.7%), hemoglobin (12.0 g/dl), and MCV (52.5 fl) than the control, vehicle-injected uremic animals (37.4%, 13.1 g/dl and 60.4 fl., respectively). The reticulocyte counts of the intoxicated rats were increased. Serum iron and transferrin iron binding capacity were unchanged. Thus aluminium intoxication of the uremic organism leads to a microcytic anemia possibly by interfering directly with normal hemoglobin synthesis.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6872366

Citation

Touam, M, et al. "Aluminium-induced, Reversible Microcytic Anemia in Chronic Renal Failure: Clinical and Experimental Studies." Clinical Nephrology, vol. 19, no. 6, 1983, pp. 295-8.
Touam M, Martinez F, Lacour B, et al. Aluminium-induced, reversible microcytic anemia in chronic renal failure: clinical and experimental studies. Clin Nephrol. 1983;19(6):295-8.
Touam, M., Martinez, F., Lacour, B., Bourdon, R., Zingraff, J., Di Giulio, S., & Drüeke, T. (1983). Aluminium-induced, reversible microcytic anemia in chronic renal failure: clinical and experimental studies. Clinical Nephrology, 19(6), pp. 295-8.
Touam M, et al. Aluminium-induced, Reversible Microcytic Anemia in Chronic Renal Failure: Clinical and Experimental Studies. Clin Nephrol. 1983;19(6):295-8. PubMed PMID: 6872366.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aluminium-induced, reversible microcytic anemia in chronic renal failure: clinical and experimental studies. AU - Touam,M, AU - Martinez,F, AU - Lacour,B, AU - Bourdon,R, AU - Zingraff,J, AU - Di Giulio,S, AU - Drüeke,T, PY - 1983/6/1/pubmed PY - 1983/6/1/medline PY - 1983/6/1/entrez SP - 295 EP - 8 JF - Clinical nephrology JO - Clin. Nephrol. VL - 19 IS - 6 N2 - Ten chronic hemodialysis patients with severe aluminium (Al) intoxication developed a microcytic anemia despite oral iron supplementation. Their microcytosis was reversible after deionization of the dialysis water. Ten age and sex matched hemodialysis patients who were not Al intoxicated but who had a comparable treatment schedule and time on dialysis had no such microcytosis. In order to investigate a possible direct role of Al we intoxicated uremic rats by daily (6/7 days a week) intraperitoneal injections of 30 nmoles/day of aluminium. After 3 months, the Al-intoxicated uremic rats had a significantly lower hematocrit (34.7%), hemoglobin (12.0 g/dl), and MCV (52.5 fl) than the control, vehicle-injected uremic animals (37.4%, 13.1 g/dl and 60.4 fl., respectively). The reticulocyte counts of the intoxicated rats were increased. Serum iron and transferrin iron binding capacity were unchanged. Thus aluminium intoxication of the uremic organism leads to a microcytic anemia possibly by interfering directly with normal hemoglobin synthesis. SN - 0301-0430 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6872366/Aluminium_induced_reversible_microcytic_anemia_in_chronic_renal_failure:_clinical_and_experimental_studies_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/441 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -