Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A longitudinal study of interests of medical technologists: comparisons between medical technology and other allied health fields.
J Allied Health. 1983 May; 12(2):117-26.JA

Abstract

Three good reasons to improve allied health student selection can be suggested: There are often more applicants than spaces; there is often high attrition within programs; and it is often difficult for a student to transfer in or out of a program without cost in time and/or money. Although college grade point average (GPA) has been the best single predictor of continuing academic success in an allied health major, this GPA is not available for entering freshmen. Also, students' curriculum or career choices are often uninformed. It seemed worthwhile, therefore, to consider what could be added to evaluation of high school achievement and expressed interest to improve the selective admission of students to allied health programs. This study evaluated the use of the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) and the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory (SCII) as a selection technique for medical technology students. Results of the two interest inventories appeared to be similar in comparable areas. Our findings did not support the use of either test as a selection device for medical technology students, primarily because of the lack of discrimination within allied health professions. The graduates' scores on the basic interest and occupational scales of the SVIB-SCII did show shared interests and similarity with other allied health professions. This suggests that these tests could be of value in more general counseling of students interested in the allied health professions.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6874553

Citation

Clark, A W., and R F. Sharf. "A Longitudinal Study of Interests of Medical Technologists: Comparisons Between Medical Technology and Other Allied Health Fields." Journal of Allied Health, vol. 12, no. 2, 1983, pp. 117-26.
Clark AW, Sharf RF. A longitudinal study of interests of medical technologists: comparisons between medical technology and other allied health fields. J Allied Health. 1983;12(2):117-26.
Clark, A. W., & Sharf, R. F. (1983). A longitudinal study of interests of medical technologists: comparisons between medical technology and other allied health fields. Journal of Allied Health, 12(2), 117-26.
Clark AW, Sharf RF. A Longitudinal Study of Interests of Medical Technologists: Comparisons Between Medical Technology and Other Allied Health Fields. J Allied Health. 1983;12(2):117-26. PubMed PMID: 6874553.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A longitudinal study of interests of medical technologists: comparisons between medical technology and other allied health fields. AU - Clark,A W, AU - Sharf,R F, PY - 1983/5/1/pubmed PY - 1983/5/1/medline PY - 1983/5/1/entrez SP - 117 EP - 26 JF - Journal of allied health JO - J Allied Health VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - Three good reasons to improve allied health student selection can be suggested: There are often more applicants than spaces; there is often high attrition within programs; and it is often difficult for a student to transfer in or out of a program without cost in time and/or money. Although college grade point average (GPA) has been the best single predictor of continuing academic success in an allied health major, this GPA is not available for entering freshmen. Also, students' curriculum or career choices are often uninformed. It seemed worthwhile, therefore, to consider what could be added to evaluation of high school achievement and expressed interest to improve the selective admission of students to allied health programs. This study evaluated the use of the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) and the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory (SCII) as a selection technique for medical technology students. Results of the two interest inventories appeared to be similar in comparable areas. Our findings did not support the use of either test as a selection device for medical technology students, primarily because of the lack of discrimination within allied health professions. The graduates' scores on the basic interest and occupational scales of the SVIB-SCII did show shared interests and similarity with other allied health professions. This suggests that these tests could be of value in more general counseling of students interested in the allied health professions. SN - 0090-7421 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6874553/A_longitudinal_study_of_interests_of_medical_technologists:_comparisons_between_medical_technology_and_other_allied_health_fields_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -