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Portal hypertension, size of esophageal varices, and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in alcoholic cirrhosis.
Gastroenterology. 1980 Dec; 79(6):1139-44.G

Abstract

We studied the relationship between the degree of portal hypertension measured by the gradient between wedged and free hepatic venous pressures, the size of esophageal varices, and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in a series of 100 unselected patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. The degree of portal hypertension was not different in patients with no visible, in those with small-sized, and in those with large-sized, esophageal varices. The degree of portal hypertension was not different in patients without and with gastrointestinal bleeding, whether the source of hemorrhage was ruptured varices or acute gastric erosions. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whether due to ruptured varices or acute gastric erosions, was significantly higher in patients with large-sized, than in those with no visible or small-sized, esophageal varices. It is concluded that, in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, (a) the degree of portal hypertension has no predictive value for the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and (b) large-sized esophageal varices are associated with a high risk of occurrence or recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding and could be taken into account for a better selection of patients for portacaval shunt.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

6969201

Citation

Lebrec, D, et al. "Portal Hypertension, Size of Esophageal Varices, and Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Alcoholic Cirrhosis." Gastroenterology, vol. 79, no. 6, 1980, pp. 1139-44.
Lebrec D, De Fleury P, Rueff B, et al. Portal hypertension, size of esophageal varices, and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in alcoholic cirrhosis. Gastroenterology. 1980;79(6):1139-44.
Lebrec, D., De Fleury, P., Rueff, B., Nahum, H., & Benhamou, J. P. (1980). Portal hypertension, size of esophageal varices, and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in alcoholic cirrhosis. Gastroenterology, 79(6), 1139-44.
Lebrec D, et al. Portal Hypertension, Size of Esophageal Varices, and Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Alcoholic Cirrhosis. Gastroenterology. 1980;79(6):1139-44. PubMed PMID: 6969201.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Portal hypertension, size of esophageal varices, and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in alcoholic cirrhosis. AU - Lebrec,D, AU - De Fleury,P, AU - Rueff,B, AU - Nahum,H, AU - Benhamou,J P, PY - 1980/12/1/pubmed PY - 1980/12/1/medline PY - 1980/12/1/entrez SP - 1139 EP - 44 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 79 IS - 6 N2 - We studied the relationship between the degree of portal hypertension measured by the gradient between wedged and free hepatic venous pressures, the size of esophageal varices, and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in a series of 100 unselected patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. The degree of portal hypertension was not different in patients with no visible, in those with small-sized, and in those with large-sized, esophageal varices. The degree of portal hypertension was not different in patients without and with gastrointestinal bleeding, whether the source of hemorrhage was ruptured varices or acute gastric erosions. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whether due to ruptured varices or acute gastric erosions, was significantly higher in patients with large-sized, than in those with no visible or small-sized, esophageal varices. It is concluded that, in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, (a) the degree of portal hypertension has no predictive value for the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and (b) large-sized esophageal varices are associated with a high risk of occurrence or recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding and could be taken into account for a better selection of patients for portacaval shunt. SN - 0016-5085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/6969201/Portal_hypertension_size_of_esophageal_varices_and_risk_of_gastrointestinal_bleeding_in_alcoholic_cirrhosis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -