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[Incidence, prevention and therapy of acute mountain sickness].
Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1982 Apr 03; 112(14):492-5.SM

Abstract

The symptoms and signs of acute mountain sickness are present in about half of the tourists trekking in Nepal to an altitude of 42000 m. The most common symptoms are headache and nausea. Pulmonary rales are found in more than 10% of trekkers, while high altitude pulmonary edema is rare. Retinal hemorrhages occur almost exclusively above 5000 m. A careful history and physical examination are generally sufficient for medical evaluation of fitness for high altitude. There are no specific tests to predict performance at altitude. The most effective prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness is "slow" ascent, which is arbitrarily defined as an increase in sleeping altitude of 300-400 m per 24 hours. Sufficient fluid intake is also very important. Prophylactic administration of acetazolamide reduces the incidence and severity of acute mountain sickness. Mild forms of acute mountain sickness are treated by a rest day, whereas patients with severe disease should descend as soon as possible.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

7079685

Citation

Oelz, O. "[Incidence, Prevention and Therapy of Acute Mountain Sickness]." Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift, vol. 112, no. 14, 1982, pp. 492-5.
Oelz O. [Incidence, prevention and therapy of acute mountain sickness]. Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1982;112(14):492-5.
Oelz, O. (1982). [Incidence, prevention and therapy of acute mountain sickness]. Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift, 112(14), 492-5.
Oelz O. [Incidence, Prevention and Therapy of Acute Mountain Sickness]. Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1982 Apr 3;112(14):492-5. PubMed PMID: 7079685.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Incidence, prevention and therapy of acute mountain sickness]. A1 - Oelz,O, PY - 1982/4/3/pubmed PY - 1982/4/3/medline PY - 1982/4/3/entrez SP - 492 EP - 5 JF - Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift JO - Schweiz Med Wochenschr VL - 112 IS - 14 N2 - The symptoms and signs of acute mountain sickness are present in about half of the tourists trekking in Nepal to an altitude of 42000 m. The most common symptoms are headache and nausea. Pulmonary rales are found in more than 10% of trekkers, while high altitude pulmonary edema is rare. Retinal hemorrhages occur almost exclusively above 5000 m. A careful history and physical examination are generally sufficient for medical evaluation of fitness for high altitude. There are no specific tests to predict performance at altitude. The most effective prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness is "slow" ascent, which is arbitrarily defined as an increase in sleeping altitude of 300-400 m per 24 hours. Sufficient fluid intake is also very important. Prophylactic administration of acetazolamide reduces the incidence and severity of acute mountain sickness. Mild forms of acute mountain sickness are treated by a rest day, whereas patients with severe disease should descend as soon as possible. SN - 0036-7672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7079685/[Incidence_prevention_and_therapy_of_acute_mountain_sickness]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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