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Acclimatization to dry heat: active men vs. active women.

Abstract

Physiological responses to exercise in dry heat were compared between six active men [maximum O2 consumption (VO2max), 51.4 +/- 1.2 ml . kg-1 . min-1] and four active women (VO2max, 47.2 +/- 1.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1) before, during, and after heat acclimatization. Subjects cycled a maximum of 2 h at 40% VO2max at 45 degrees C dry-bulb temperature, 23 degrees C wet-bulb temperature for 11 days. Prior to acclimatization there were no sexual differences for performance time, rate of increase of rectal temperature (delta Tre), or sweat rate per degree C increase of rectal temperature (msw/delta Tre). Sweat rate (msw) was greater for the men than for the women. Although there was no difference in the rate of increase of heart rate (delta HR), HR for the women was maintained 15-20 beats . min-1 higher than for the men. Acclimatization occurred for both sexes as indicated by reduced Tre and HR and increased msw and performance time. With acclimatization the women had longer performance times than the men. Even though the men still had greater msw, delta Tre was also greater; therefore msw/delta Tre for the men was less than for the women. Neither HR nor delta HR was different between the sexes. Throughout, resting hematocrit for the women was less than for the men; no changes in hematocrit were observed during exercise or with acclimatization. Plasma protein concentration increased during exercise on all days; no changes in plasma osmolality were observed. It is concluded that active women perform exercise of equal relative intensity in dry heat as well as active men. Moreover active women acclimatized to heat at a faster rate or to a greater extent than did active men.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7085415

Citation

Horstman, D H., and E Christensen. "Acclimatization to Dry Heat: Active Men Vs. Active Women." Journal of Applied Physiology: Respiratory, Environmental and Exercise Physiology, vol. 52, no. 4, 1982, pp. 825-31.
Horstman DH, Christensen E. Acclimatization to dry heat: active men vs. active women. J Appl Physiol Respir Environ Exerc Physiol. 1982;52(4):825-31.
Horstman, D. H., & Christensen, E. (1982). Acclimatization to dry heat: active men vs. active women. Journal of Applied Physiology: Respiratory, Environmental and Exercise Physiology, 52(4), 825-31.
Horstman DH, Christensen E. Acclimatization to Dry Heat: Active Men Vs. Active Women. J Appl Physiol Respir Environ Exerc Physiol. 1982;52(4):825-31. PubMed PMID: 7085415.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acclimatization to dry heat: active men vs. active women. AU - Horstman,D H, AU - Christensen,E, PY - 1982/4/1/pubmed PY - 1982/4/1/medline PY - 1982/4/1/entrez SP - 825 EP - 31 JF - Journal of applied physiology: respiratory, environmental and exercise physiology JO - J Appl Physiol Respir Environ Exerc Physiol VL - 52 IS - 4 N2 - Physiological responses to exercise in dry heat were compared between six active men [maximum O2 consumption (VO2max), 51.4 +/- 1.2 ml . kg-1 . min-1] and four active women (VO2max, 47.2 +/- 1.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1) before, during, and after heat acclimatization. Subjects cycled a maximum of 2 h at 40% VO2max at 45 degrees C dry-bulb temperature, 23 degrees C wet-bulb temperature for 11 days. Prior to acclimatization there were no sexual differences for performance time, rate of increase of rectal temperature (delta Tre), or sweat rate per degree C increase of rectal temperature (msw/delta Tre). Sweat rate (msw) was greater for the men than for the women. Although there was no difference in the rate of increase of heart rate (delta HR), HR for the women was maintained 15-20 beats . min-1 higher than for the men. Acclimatization occurred for both sexes as indicated by reduced Tre and HR and increased msw and performance time. With acclimatization the women had longer performance times than the men. Even though the men still had greater msw, delta Tre was also greater; therefore msw/delta Tre for the men was less than for the women. Neither HR nor delta HR was different between the sexes. Throughout, resting hematocrit for the women was less than for the men; no changes in hematocrit were observed during exercise or with acclimatization. Plasma protein concentration increased during exercise on all days; no changes in plasma osmolality were observed. It is concluded that active women perform exercise of equal relative intensity in dry heat as well as active men. Moreover active women acclimatized to heat at a faster rate or to a greater extent than did active men. SN - 0161-7567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7085415/Acclimatization_to_dry_heat:_active_men_vs__active_women_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -