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Modifications of the erythrocyte deformability alter the effect of temperature on the relative viscosity of human blood.
Biorheology 1982; 19(1/2):237-44B

Abstract

The relative viscosity of normal red cell suspensions is independent of temperature at high shear rates. The relative viscosity of suspensions with normovolemic sphered erythrocytes having a reduced deformability, however, is higher at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C. It is concluded that the changes of the lipoprotein configuration within the erythrocyte membrane which are proposed to be involved in the disc-sphere-transformation of the red cell, depend on temperature and are responsible for the increased relative viscosity at 37 degrees C.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7093454

Citation

Rogausch, H. "Modifications of the Erythrocyte Deformability Alter the Effect of Temperature On the Relative Viscosity of Human Blood." Biorheology, vol. 19, no. 1/2, 1982, pp. 237-44.
Rogausch H. Modifications of the erythrocyte deformability alter the effect of temperature on the relative viscosity of human blood. Biorheology. 1982;19(1/2):237-44.
Rogausch, H. (1982). Modifications of the erythrocyte deformability alter the effect of temperature on the relative viscosity of human blood. Biorheology, 19(1/2), pp. 237-44.
Rogausch H. Modifications of the Erythrocyte Deformability Alter the Effect of Temperature On the Relative Viscosity of Human Blood. Biorheology. 1982;19(1/2):237-44. PubMed PMID: 7093454.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Modifications of the erythrocyte deformability alter the effect of temperature on the relative viscosity of human blood. A1 - Rogausch,H, PY - 1982/1/1/pubmed PY - 1982/1/1/medline PY - 1982/1/1/entrez SP - 237 EP - 44 JF - Biorheology JO - Biorheology VL - 19 IS - 1/2 N2 - The relative viscosity of normal red cell suspensions is independent of temperature at high shear rates. The relative viscosity of suspensions with normovolemic sphered erythrocytes having a reduced deformability, however, is higher at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C. It is concluded that the changes of the lipoprotein configuration within the erythrocyte membrane which are proposed to be involved in the disc-sphere-transformation of the red cell, depend on temperature and are responsible for the increased relative viscosity at 37 degrees C. SN - 0006-355X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7093454/Modifications_of_the_erythrocyte_deformability_alter_the_effect_of_temperature_on_the_relative_viscosity_of_human_blood_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -