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Auxiliary cooling: comparison of air-cooled vs. water-cooled vests in hot-dry and hot-wet environments.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1982 Aug; 53(8):785-9.AS

Abstract

Water-cooled, air-cooled, and ambient air-ventilated auxiliary cooling vests were evaluated in a hot-wet climate (HW) (35 degrees C, 75% R.H.) and a hot-dry environment (HD) with additional infrared radiation (Ta = 49 degrees C, 20% R.H., 68 degrees C black globe temperature). Twelve subjects dressed in full chemical warfare combat uniforms underwent 120 min of heat exposure in each combination of climate and cooling vest, except for the hot-dry environment and ambient-air vest. During each exposure, total exercise time was 20 min and rest time 100 min. This resulted in a mean time weighted metabolic rate of 180 W. Both water-cooled and air-cooled vests were sufficient for cooling in the HW climate: heat storage (delta S) was 13 and 7 W, final rectal temperature (Tre) 37.4 and 37.3 degrees C, and heart rate (HR) 124 and 112 b . min-1, respectively. While using the ambient-air vest, all variables were significantly (p less than 0.05) higher (delta S, 25 W; Tre, 37.7 degrees C; HR, 139 b . min-1; respectively). In the HD climate, both water and air-cooled vests were insufficient with a delta S of 46 and 48 W, final Tre of 38.4 and 38.3 degrees C, and final HR of 151 and 147 b . min-1. However, both cooling vests improved the subjects' physiological status compared to these predicted variables without auxiliary cooling. No significant differences were found between the air or the water-cooled vests in either the HD or HW climates. It was concluded that an air-cooled vest can be used with the same efficiency as a water-cooled vest. In contrast, the ambient-air vest was shown to have a low effectiveness in HW and to be dangerous in a HD climate.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7181810

Citation

Shapiro, Y, et al. "Auxiliary Cooling: Comparison of Air-cooled Vs. Water-cooled Vests in Hot-dry and Hot-wet Environments." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 53, no. 8, 1982, pp. 785-9.
Shapiro Y, Pandolf KB, Sawka MN, et al. Auxiliary cooling: comparison of air-cooled vs. water-cooled vests in hot-dry and hot-wet environments. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1982;53(8):785-9.
Shapiro, Y., Pandolf, K. B., Sawka, M. N., Toner, M. M., Winsmann, F. R., & Goldman, R. F. (1982). Auxiliary cooling: comparison of air-cooled vs. water-cooled vests in hot-dry and hot-wet environments. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 53(8), 785-9.
Shapiro Y, et al. Auxiliary Cooling: Comparison of Air-cooled Vs. Water-cooled Vests in Hot-dry and Hot-wet Environments. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1982;53(8):785-9. PubMed PMID: 7181810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Auxiliary cooling: comparison of air-cooled vs. water-cooled vests in hot-dry and hot-wet environments. AU - Shapiro,Y, AU - Pandolf,K B, AU - Sawka,M N, AU - Toner,M M, AU - Winsmann,F R, AU - Goldman,R F, PY - 1982/8/1/pubmed PY - 1982/8/1/medline PY - 1982/8/1/entrez SP - 785 EP - 9 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 53 IS - 8 N2 - Water-cooled, air-cooled, and ambient air-ventilated auxiliary cooling vests were evaluated in a hot-wet climate (HW) (35 degrees C, 75% R.H.) and a hot-dry environment (HD) with additional infrared radiation (Ta = 49 degrees C, 20% R.H., 68 degrees C black globe temperature). Twelve subjects dressed in full chemical warfare combat uniforms underwent 120 min of heat exposure in each combination of climate and cooling vest, except for the hot-dry environment and ambient-air vest. During each exposure, total exercise time was 20 min and rest time 100 min. This resulted in a mean time weighted metabolic rate of 180 W. Both water-cooled and air-cooled vests were sufficient for cooling in the HW climate: heat storage (delta S) was 13 and 7 W, final rectal temperature (Tre) 37.4 and 37.3 degrees C, and heart rate (HR) 124 and 112 b . min-1, respectively. While using the ambient-air vest, all variables were significantly (p less than 0.05) higher (delta S, 25 W; Tre, 37.7 degrees C; HR, 139 b . min-1; respectively). In the HD climate, both water and air-cooled vests were insufficient with a delta S of 46 and 48 W, final Tre of 38.4 and 38.3 degrees C, and final HR of 151 and 147 b . min-1. However, both cooling vests improved the subjects' physiological status compared to these predicted variables without auxiliary cooling. No significant differences were found between the air or the water-cooled vests in either the HD or HW climates. It was concluded that an air-cooled vest can be used with the same efficiency as a water-cooled vest. In contrast, the ambient-air vest was shown to have a low effectiveness in HW and to be dangerous in a HD climate. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7181810/Auxiliary_cooling:_comparison_of_air_cooled_vs__water_cooled_vests_in_hot_dry_and_hot_wet_environments_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -