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Attachment and early maltreatment.
Child Dev. 1981 Mar; 52(1):44-52.CD

Abstract

Attachment outcomes of 31 maltreatment cases (extreme neglect or abuse) selected from a total poverty sample of 267 high-risk mothers were compared at 12 and 18 months to a subsample of 33 cases with a history of excellent care. In accordance with the Bowlby-Ainsworth hypothesis, the maltreatment group was characterized by a low proportion of secure attachment (Ainsworth's group B) at 12 months (38% compared to 75% in the excellent care group and 55% in the remaining total sample); however, differences at 18 months were not significant. Specifically, 50% of the cases with a history of neglect were in Ainsworth's group C (anxious/resistant attachment) at 12 months, compared to usual reports of approximately 10% and compared to 21% in the total poverty sample. Patterns of attachment between 12 and 18 months remained stable for the mother-infant pairs in the excellent care group, however, 52% of the mistreated infants changed classifications. For the neglect subgroup there was considerable movement toward Ainsworth's group A (anxious/avoidant attachment) at 18 months and some movement toward group B. An examination of the case histories of mother-infant pairs indicated that changes in attachment between 12 and 18 months were related to changing life events, support from family, and out-of-home care. These findings are highly tentative as were the findings which suggested that secure attachment within the maltreatment group was associated with the presence of a supportive family member, less chaotic life-style, and, in some instances, a more robust infant.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7238152

Citation

Egeland, B, and L A. Sroufe. "Attachment and Early Maltreatment." Child Development, vol. 52, no. 1, 1981, pp. 44-52.
Egeland B, Sroufe LA. Attachment and early maltreatment. Child Dev. 1981;52(1):44-52.
Egeland, B., & Sroufe, L. A. (1981). Attachment and early maltreatment. Child Development, 52(1), 44-52.
Egeland B, Sroufe LA. Attachment and Early Maltreatment. Child Dev. 1981;52(1):44-52. PubMed PMID: 7238152.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attachment and early maltreatment. AU - Egeland,B, AU - Sroufe,L A, PY - 1981/3/1/pubmed PY - 1981/3/1/medline PY - 1981/3/1/entrez SP - 44 EP - 52 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 52 IS - 1 N2 - Attachment outcomes of 31 maltreatment cases (extreme neglect or abuse) selected from a total poverty sample of 267 high-risk mothers were compared at 12 and 18 months to a subsample of 33 cases with a history of excellent care. In accordance with the Bowlby-Ainsworth hypothesis, the maltreatment group was characterized by a low proportion of secure attachment (Ainsworth's group B) at 12 months (38% compared to 75% in the excellent care group and 55% in the remaining total sample); however, differences at 18 months were not significant. Specifically, 50% of the cases with a history of neglect were in Ainsworth's group C (anxious/resistant attachment) at 12 months, compared to usual reports of approximately 10% and compared to 21% in the total poverty sample. Patterns of attachment between 12 and 18 months remained stable for the mother-infant pairs in the excellent care group, however, 52% of the mistreated infants changed classifications. For the neglect subgroup there was considerable movement toward Ainsworth's group A (anxious/avoidant attachment) at 18 months and some movement toward group B. An examination of the case histories of mother-infant pairs indicated that changes in attachment between 12 and 18 months were related to changing life events, support from family, and out-of-home care. These findings are highly tentative as were the findings which suggested that secure attachment within the maltreatment group was associated with the presence of a supportive family member, less chaotic life-style, and, in some instances, a more robust infant. SN - 0009-3920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7238152/Attachment_and_early_maltreatment_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/toddlerdevelopment.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -