Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sexual development and fertility of Jamaican female patients with homozygous sickle cell disease.
Arch Intern Med. 1981 Sep; 141(10):1295-7.AI

Abstract

Results of a questionnaire study of 91 Jamaican patients with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease and 59 Jamaican control subjects of similar socioeconomic status indicated a mean delay of 2.3 years in age at menarche and of 3.9 years in age at first pregnancy in Ss disease. The mean interval between first sexual exposure and pregnancy was similar in the two groups. The delay in age at first pregnancy in SS disease resulted partly from the delay in puberty, but it also resulted from a further delay in first sexual exposure, with a mean interval between menarche and first sexual exposure of 2.6 and 4.4 years in control subjects and patients, respectively. Physical and social factors that related to this delay were reflected in the higher prevalence of casual unions in patients; this finding implied lesser sexual exposure. Although the similar interval between first sexual exposure and pregnancy did not suggest a lesser fertility in patients with SS disease, the number of infants born to patients with SS disease was less at all ages compared with Jamaican standards. This finding might reflect lesser fertility subsequent to the first pregnancy.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7271403

Citation

Alleyne, S I., et al. "Sexual Development and Fertility of Jamaican Female Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 141, no. 10, 1981, pp. 1295-7.
Alleyne SI, Rauseo RD, Serjeant GR. Sexual development and fertility of Jamaican female patients with homozygous sickle cell disease. Arch Intern Med. 1981;141(10):1295-7.
Alleyne, S. I., Rauseo, R. D., & Serjeant, G. R. (1981). Sexual development and fertility of Jamaican female patients with homozygous sickle cell disease. Archives of Internal Medicine, 141(10), 1295-7.
Alleyne SI, Rauseo RD, Serjeant GR. Sexual Development and Fertility of Jamaican Female Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease. Arch Intern Med. 1981;141(10):1295-7. PubMed PMID: 7271403.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexual development and fertility of Jamaican female patients with homozygous sickle cell disease. AU - Alleyne,S I, AU - Rauseo,R D, AU - Serjeant,G R, PY - 1981/9/1/pubmed PY - 1981/9/1/medline PY - 1981/9/1/entrez SP - 1295 EP - 7 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 141 IS - 10 N2 - Results of a questionnaire study of 91 Jamaican patients with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease and 59 Jamaican control subjects of similar socioeconomic status indicated a mean delay of 2.3 years in age at menarche and of 3.9 years in age at first pregnancy in Ss disease. The mean interval between first sexual exposure and pregnancy was similar in the two groups. The delay in age at first pregnancy in SS disease resulted partly from the delay in puberty, but it also resulted from a further delay in first sexual exposure, with a mean interval between menarche and first sexual exposure of 2.6 and 4.4 years in control subjects and patients, respectively. Physical and social factors that related to this delay were reflected in the higher prevalence of casual unions in patients; this finding implied lesser sexual exposure. Although the similar interval between first sexual exposure and pregnancy did not suggest a lesser fertility in patients with SS disease, the number of infants born to patients with SS disease was less at all ages compared with Jamaican standards. This finding might reflect lesser fertility subsequent to the first pregnancy. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7271403/Sexual_development_and_fertility_of_Jamaican_female_patients_with_homozygous_sickle_cell_disease_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/141/pg/1295 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -