Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Putting objectivity in the allied health student selection process.
J Allied Health. 1981 Nov; 10(4):226-39.JA

Abstract

The allied health student selection process in often not as well organized as those found in the other health professions. This may be an outcome of the newness of some of the allied health disciplines. Allied health educators must assure the potential applicant, the consumer, and governmental agencies that their admissions process is rational, fair, and humane. This paper describes four major types of decisions which can help ensure that these qualities are present. The steps include: (a) refining the criteria by which applicants are to be evaluated, (b) identifying information sources whose data can be quantified, (c) transforming these data into measurable form, and, (d) conducting evaluation of admissions criteria. Practical suggestions are offered at each step to help the allied health educator put quality control into the student selection process.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7328034

Citation

Dietrich, M C.. "Putting Objectivity in the Allied Health Student Selection Process." Journal of Allied Health, vol. 10, no. 4, 1981, pp. 226-39.
Dietrich MC. Putting objectivity in the allied health student selection process. J Allied Health. 1981;10(4):226-39.
Dietrich, M. C. (1981). Putting objectivity in the allied health student selection process. Journal of Allied Health, 10(4), 226-39.
Dietrich MC. Putting Objectivity in the Allied Health Student Selection Process. J Allied Health. 1981;10(4):226-39. PubMed PMID: 7328034.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Putting objectivity in the allied health student selection process. A1 - Dietrich,M C, PY - 1981/11/1/pubmed PY - 1981/11/1/medline PY - 1981/11/1/entrez SP - 226 EP - 39 JF - Journal of allied health JO - J Allied Health VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - The allied health student selection process in often not as well organized as those found in the other health professions. This may be an outcome of the newness of some of the allied health disciplines. Allied health educators must assure the potential applicant, the consumer, and governmental agencies that their admissions process is rational, fair, and humane. This paper describes four major types of decisions which can help ensure that these qualities are present. The steps include: (a) refining the criteria by which applicants are to be evaluated, (b) identifying information sources whose data can be quantified, (c) transforming these data into measurable form, and, (d) conducting evaluation of admissions criteria. Practical suggestions are offered at each step to help the allied health educator put quality control into the student selection process. SN - 0090-7421 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7328034/Putting_objectivity_in_the_allied_health_student_selection_process_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -