Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The paradoxical moon illusions.
Percept Mot Skills. 1980 Feb; 50(1):271-83.PM

Abstract

An adaptation theory of visual space is developed and applied to the data of a variety of studies of visual space perception. By distinguishing between the perceived distance of an object and that of the background or sky, the theory resolves the paradox of the moon illusions and relates both perceived size and perceived distance of the moon to the absolute level of spatial adaptation. The theory assumes that visual space expands or contracts in adjustment to changes in the sensory indicators of depth and provides a measure, A, of this adaptation-level. Changes in A have two effects--one on perceived size, one on perceived distance. Since A varies systematically as a function of angle of regard, availability of cues, and the total space-value, A is a measure of the moon illusions, and a practical index of individual differences by pilots and astronauts in the perception of the size and distance of objects on the ground and in the air.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7367178

Citation

Gilinsky, A S.. "The Paradoxical Moon Illusions." Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 50, no. 1, 1980, pp. 271-83.
Gilinsky AS. The paradoxical moon illusions. Percept Mot Skills. 1980;50(1):271-83.
Gilinsky, A. S. (1980). The paradoxical moon illusions. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 50(1), 271-83.
Gilinsky AS. The Paradoxical Moon Illusions. Percept Mot Skills. 1980;50(1):271-83. PubMed PMID: 7367178.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The paradoxical moon illusions. A1 - Gilinsky,A S, PY - 1980/2/1/pubmed PY - 1980/2/1/medline PY - 1980/2/1/entrez SP - 271 EP - 83 JF - Perceptual and motor skills JO - Percept Mot Skills VL - 50 IS - 1 N2 - An adaptation theory of visual space is developed and applied to the data of a variety of studies of visual space perception. By distinguishing between the perceived distance of an object and that of the background or sky, the theory resolves the paradox of the moon illusions and relates both perceived size and perceived distance of the moon to the absolute level of spatial adaptation. The theory assumes that visual space expands or contracts in adjustment to changes in the sensory indicators of depth and provides a measure, A, of this adaptation-level. Changes in A have two effects--one on perceived size, one on perceived distance. Since A varies systematically as a function of angle of regard, availability of cues, and the total space-value, A is a measure of the moon illusions, and a practical index of individual differences by pilots and astronauts in the perception of the size and distance of objects on the ground and in the air. SN - 0031-5125 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7367178/The_paradoxical_moon_illusions_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.2466/pms.1980.50.1.271?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -