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Pediatric urolithiases: a ten-year review.
Pediatrics 1980; 65(6):1068-72Ped

Abstract

Sixty-one children who presented with urinary calculi between 1967 and 1977 were reviewed. The overall incidence of calculus disease in our patients was higher than reported previously from other centers in this country. Because presenting symptoms varied, a high index of suspicion was often required for diagnosis. Stones of infection were the most common type identified. Inasmuch as the revurrence rate of calculi in children was low (6.5%), careful consideration of time and cost is warrented before extensive evaluation for metabolic causes of stone formation is undertaken. Immobilization was an important factor in the etiology of stone disease. Most stones less than 5 mm in size passed without surgery.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7375229

Citation

Walther, P C., et al. "Pediatric Urolithiases: a Ten-year Review." Pediatrics, vol. 65, no. 6, 1980, pp. 1068-72.
Walther PC, Lamm D, Kaplan GW. Pediatric urolithiases: a ten-year review. Pediatrics. 1980;65(6):1068-72.
Walther, P. C., Lamm, D., & Kaplan, G. W. (1980). Pediatric urolithiases: a ten-year review. Pediatrics, 65(6), pp. 1068-72.
Walther PC, Lamm D, Kaplan GW. Pediatric Urolithiases: a Ten-year Review. Pediatrics. 1980;65(6):1068-72. PubMed PMID: 7375229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pediatric urolithiases: a ten-year review. AU - Walther,P C, AU - Lamm,D, AU - Kaplan,G W, PY - 1980/6/1/pubmed PY - 1980/6/1/medline PY - 1980/6/1/entrez SP - 1068 EP - 72 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 65 IS - 6 N2 - Sixty-one children who presented with urinary calculi between 1967 and 1977 were reviewed. The overall incidence of calculus disease in our patients was higher than reported previously from other centers in this country. Because presenting symptoms varied, a high index of suspicion was often required for diagnosis. Stones of infection were the most common type identified. Inasmuch as the revurrence rate of calculi in children was low (6.5%), careful consideration of time and cost is warrented before extensive evaluation for metabolic causes of stone formation is undertaken. Immobilization was an important factor in the etiology of stone disease. Most stones less than 5 mm in size passed without surgery. SN - 0031-4005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7375229/Pediatric_urolithiases:_a_ten_year_review_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=7375229 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -