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Delaying the introduction of complementary food until 6 months does not affect appetite or mother's report of food acceptance of breast-fed infants from 6 to 12 months in a low income, Honduran population.
J Nutr 1995; 125(11):2787-92JN

Abstract

Low income, primiparous mothers who had exclusively breast-fed for 4 mo were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) continued exclusive breast-feeding to 6 mo (EBF), 2) introduction of complementary foods at 4 mo, with ad libitum nursing 4-6 mo (SF), and 3) introduction of complementary foods at 4 mo, with maintenance of base-line nursing frequency 4-6 mo (SF-M). After the intervention phase (4-6 mo; n= 141), home visits were conducted for a subsample at 9 (n = 60) and 12 (n = 123) mo. At each visit, an observer recorded infant food intake at the midday meal and interviewed the mother regarding usual feeding patterns and the infant's acceptance of 20 common food items. All but two infants (1.5%) were breast-fed to 9 mo and all but eight (6%) to 12 mo. There were no significant differences among groups in breast-feeding frequency, amount or number of foods consumed at the midday meal, percentage of food offered that was consumed, usual daily number of meals and snacks, number of food groups consumed, or overall food acceptance score. Frequency of consumption of foods from eight different food groups (dairy, meats, eggs, grains, beans, fruits, vegetables, tubers) was not significantly different among groups except that, at 9 mo only, the SF group (but not the SF-M group) consumed more vegetables than did the EBF group. These results indicate that delaying the introduction of complementary foods until 6 mo does not adversely affect appetite or food acceptance among breast-fed infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis 95616-8669, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7472658

Citation

Cohen, R J., et al. "Delaying the Introduction of Complementary Food Until 6 Months Does Not Affect Appetite or Mother's Report of Food Acceptance of Breast-fed Infants From 6 to 12 Months in a Low Income, Honduran Population." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 125, no. 11, 1995, pp. 2787-92.
Cohen RJ, Rivera LL, Canahuati J, et al. Delaying the introduction of complementary food until 6 months does not affect appetite or mother's report of food acceptance of breast-fed infants from 6 to 12 months in a low income, Honduran population. J Nutr. 1995;125(11):2787-92.
Cohen, R. J., Rivera, L. L., Canahuati, J., Brown, K. H., & Dewey, K. G. (1995). Delaying the introduction of complementary food until 6 months does not affect appetite or mother's report of food acceptance of breast-fed infants from 6 to 12 months in a low income, Honduran population. The Journal of Nutrition, 125(11), pp. 2787-92.
Cohen RJ, et al. Delaying the Introduction of Complementary Food Until 6 Months Does Not Affect Appetite or Mother's Report of Food Acceptance of Breast-fed Infants From 6 to 12 Months in a Low Income, Honduran Population. J Nutr. 1995;125(11):2787-92. PubMed PMID: 7472658.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Delaying the introduction of complementary food until 6 months does not affect appetite or mother's report of food acceptance of breast-fed infants from 6 to 12 months in a low income, Honduran population. AU - Cohen,R J, AU - Rivera,L L, AU - Canahuati,J, AU - Brown,K H, AU - Dewey,K G, PY - 1995/11/1/pubmed PY - 1995/11/1/medline PY - 1995/11/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Breast Feeding KW - Central America KW - Comparative Studies KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Economic Factors KW - Fertility KW - Fertility Measurements KW - Health KW - Honduras KW - Infant KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Latin America KW - Low Income Population KW - North America KW - Nutrition KW - Parity KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Primiparity KW - Research Methodology KW - Social Class KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Socioeconomic Status KW - Studies KW - Supplementary Feeding KW - Weaning KW - Youth SP - 2787 EP - 92 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 125 IS - 11 N2 - Low income, primiparous mothers who had exclusively breast-fed for 4 mo were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) continued exclusive breast-feeding to 6 mo (EBF), 2) introduction of complementary foods at 4 mo, with ad libitum nursing 4-6 mo (SF), and 3) introduction of complementary foods at 4 mo, with maintenance of base-line nursing frequency 4-6 mo (SF-M). After the intervention phase (4-6 mo; n= 141), home visits were conducted for a subsample at 9 (n = 60) and 12 (n = 123) mo. At each visit, an observer recorded infant food intake at the midday meal and interviewed the mother regarding usual feeding patterns and the infant's acceptance of 20 common food items. All but two infants (1.5%) were breast-fed to 9 mo and all but eight (6%) to 12 mo. There were no significant differences among groups in breast-feeding frequency, amount or number of foods consumed at the midday meal, percentage of food offered that was consumed, usual daily number of meals and snacks, number of food groups consumed, or overall food acceptance score. Frequency of consumption of foods from eight different food groups (dairy, meats, eggs, grains, beans, fruits, vegetables, tubers) was not significantly different among groups except that, at 9 mo only, the SF group (but not the SF-M group) consumed more vegetables than did the EBF group. These results indicate that delaying the introduction of complementary foods until 6 mo does not adversely affect appetite or food acceptance among breast-fed infants. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7472658/Delaying_the_introduction_of_complementary_food_until_6_months_does_not_affect_appetite_or_mother's_report_of_food_acceptance_of_breast_fed_infants_from_6_to_12_months_in_a_low_income_Honduran_population_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/125.11.2787 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -