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[Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Lynch syndrome].
Rev Gastroenterol Mex. 1995 Jul-Sep; 60(3):169-74.RG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer represent 5% of the colorectal cancer population. It's characterized by an autosomal dominant inheritance; there are two variants: Lynch syndrome I is characterized by predisposition to early onset colorectal cancer, with predominance for proximal location to the splenic flexure and synchronous and/or metachronous colorectal cancers. Lynch syndrome II shares the same features, but shows association with extracolonic cancers, particularly carcinomas of endometrium, ovary and stomach. However, this syndrome is not easily recognized, due to the lack of phenotypical expression as familiar adenomatous polyposis.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this report is to review the natural history, diagnosis, treatment, surveillance of the probands and their families, and to update recent research on the genotypic risk biomarkers located in chromosomes 2, 3 and 7.

METHODS

We analyzed the available literature to discuss the clinical characteristics, pathology, genetics, management, and surveillance of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

CONCLUSIONS

The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma is not a rare event. It requires the demonstration of vertical transmission, therefore, the past history of colorectal cancer in the proband and his family should be carefully taken; including the anatomic site, histology and age at diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Cirugía Oncológica, Hospital de Oncología, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI: México, D.F.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

spa

PubMed ID

7481452

Citation

Luna Pérez, P, et al. "[Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer. Lynch Syndrome]." Revista De Gastroenterologia De Mexico, vol. 60, no. 3, 1995, pp. 169-74.
Luna Pérez P, Quiñónez G, Benítez-Bribiesca L, et al. [Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Lynch syndrome]. Rev Gastroenterol Mex. 1995;60(3):169-74.
Luna Pérez, P., Quiñónez, G., Benítez-Bribiesca, L., Barrientos, F. J., & de la Torre, A. (1995). [Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Lynch syndrome]. Revista De Gastroenterologia De Mexico, 60(3), 169-74.
Luna Pérez P, et al. [Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer. Lynch Syndrome]. Rev Gastroenterol Mex. 1995 Jul-Sep;60(3):169-74. PubMed PMID: 7481452.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Lynch syndrome]. AU - Luna Pérez,P, AU - Quiñónez,G, AU - Benítez-Bribiesca,L, AU - Barrientos,F J, AU - de la Torre,A, PY - 1995/7/1/pubmed PY - 1995/7/1/medline PY - 1995/7/1/entrez SP - 169 EP - 74 JF - Revista de gastroenterologia de Mexico JO - Rev Gastroenterol Mex VL - 60 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer represent 5% of the colorectal cancer population. It's characterized by an autosomal dominant inheritance; there are two variants: Lynch syndrome I is characterized by predisposition to early onset colorectal cancer, with predominance for proximal location to the splenic flexure and synchronous and/or metachronous colorectal cancers. Lynch syndrome II shares the same features, but shows association with extracolonic cancers, particularly carcinomas of endometrium, ovary and stomach. However, this syndrome is not easily recognized, due to the lack of phenotypical expression as familiar adenomatous polyposis. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this report is to review the natural history, diagnosis, treatment, surveillance of the probands and their families, and to update recent research on the genotypic risk biomarkers located in chromosomes 2, 3 and 7. METHODS: We analyzed the available literature to discuss the clinical characteristics, pathology, genetics, management, and surveillance of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma is not a rare event. It requires the demonstration of vertical transmission, therefore, the past history of colorectal cancer in the proband and his family should be carefully taken; including the anatomic site, histology and age at diagnosis. SN - 0375-0906 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7481452/[Hereditary_nonpolyposis_colorectal_cancer__Lynch_syndrome]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/3371 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -