Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Apomorphine: an alternative in the control of motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease].
Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 1995 Jun; 53(2):245-51.AN

Abstract

Levodopa-induced motor fluctuations (MF) is a disabling complication of Parkinson's disease (PD) and is usually refractory to conventional treatment. Apomorphine, a dopamine agonist with affinity for both D1 and D2 receptors, has been emerged as an useful alternative in the management of MF of PD. The frequency of nausea and vomiting prevented its use in the past, but the simultaneous administration of domperidone has proved to be able to control these side effects. Although apomorphine has been successfully used to control levodopa-induced MF in other countries, it has not been considered in the management of PD in Brazil. We report here our initial experience with subcutaneous injections of apomorphine combined to oral domperidone. We administered apomorphine in doses ranging from 1.5 to 3 mg in four PD patients with MF of our outpatient clinic. All the doses administered switched the "off" state to a motor response qualitatively similar to what is seen in the "on" phase induced by levodopa, including the occurrence of dyskinesia. The latency to turn "on" after apomorphine ranged from 7 to 30 minutes and the duration of the response ranged from 60 to 85 minutes. We observed yawning in all four patients, labial paresthesia in one patient and an inspecific unpleasant sensation in another patient. These side effects were not significant in our four patients. Our data show that the use of apomorphine adds a reliable and effective strategy in the management of MF of PD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Setor de Investigação em Moléstias Extrapiramidais, Disciplina de Neurologia, Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, Brasil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

por

PubMed ID

7487531

Citation

Ferraz, H B., et al. "[Apomorphine: an Alternative in the Control of Motor Fluctuations in Parkinson's Disease]." Arquivos De Neuro-psiquiatria, vol. 53, no. 2, 1995, pp. 245-51.
Ferraz HB, Azevedo-Silva SM, Borges V, et al. [Apomorphine: an alternative in the control of motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease]. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 1995;53(2):245-51.
Ferraz, H. B., Azevedo-Silva, S. M., Borges, V., Rocha, M. S., & Andrade, L. A. (1995). [Apomorphine: an alternative in the control of motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease]. Arquivos De Neuro-psiquiatria, 53(2), 245-51.
Ferraz HB, et al. [Apomorphine: an Alternative in the Control of Motor Fluctuations in Parkinson's Disease]. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 1995;53(2):245-51. PubMed PMID: 7487531.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Apomorphine: an alternative in the control of motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease]. AU - Ferraz,H B, AU - Azevedo-Silva,S M, AU - Borges,V, AU - Rocha,M S, AU - Andrade,L A, PY - 1995/6/1/pubmed PY - 1995/6/1/medline PY - 1995/6/1/entrez SP - 245 EP - 51 JF - Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria JO - Arq Neuropsiquiatr VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - Levodopa-induced motor fluctuations (MF) is a disabling complication of Parkinson's disease (PD) and is usually refractory to conventional treatment. Apomorphine, a dopamine agonist with affinity for both D1 and D2 receptors, has been emerged as an useful alternative in the management of MF of PD. The frequency of nausea and vomiting prevented its use in the past, but the simultaneous administration of domperidone has proved to be able to control these side effects. Although apomorphine has been successfully used to control levodopa-induced MF in other countries, it has not been considered in the management of PD in Brazil. We report here our initial experience with subcutaneous injections of apomorphine combined to oral domperidone. We administered apomorphine in doses ranging from 1.5 to 3 mg in four PD patients with MF of our outpatient clinic. All the doses administered switched the "off" state to a motor response qualitatively similar to what is seen in the "on" phase induced by levodopa, including the occurrence of dyskinesia. The latency to turn "on" after apomorphine ranged from 7 to 30 minutes and the duration of the response ranged from 60 to 85 minutes. We observed yawning in all four patients, labial paresthesia in one patient and an inspecific unpleasant sensation in another patient. These side effects were not significant in our four patients. Our data show that the use of apomorphine adds a reliable and effective strategy in the management of MF of PD patients. SN - 0004-282X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7487531/[Apomorphine:_an_alternative_in_the_control_of_motor_fluctuations_in_Parkinson's_disease]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/parkinsonsdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -